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Boon's guide to fanediting with Sony Vegas

Aztek463

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Easier. When rendering video, just go into the settings for whichever format you selected (the button is at the bottom of the window that pops up when you hit "render" and disable audio. Usually it's under a tab marked "audio" or somesuch. To just export audio, select on of the available audio formats: WAV, AC3, MP3 (not recommended, obviously, but it's there) and so on. Also, nothing wrong with bumping threads like this one. :)
 

z-vap

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Thanks Aztek463, that two I owe you :)

I think that button is "Customize Template", and then there is a tab for "Audio". Now I know why I couldn't play the sony avc file; it seems to be an elementary video stream.
 

Aztek463

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No problem [MENTION=10753]z-vap[/MENTION]. Just doing my best. :)
 
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Having an issue. I love this tutorial, this is pretty much what got me going in Vegas, so thanks, Boon.

So far, the step by step of this tutorial has been flawless, no issues ripping Episodes I-VI of Star Wars for my television show edit. I've start today ripping the deleted scenes from the retail DVDs. I got through Episode I no issues, but when I try to do Episode II, every time the same issue:

-I rip with DVD Fab (doesn't matter if I rip the whole DVD or if I single out the deleted scenes file and rip only that. These deleted scenes total about 12 minutes
-PGCmux splits up the audio and video for me.....files are still about 12 mins
-headache does it's thing....files are still 12 minutes
-as soon as I load the video file in to VirtualDub, even before compressing options and adding audio, I click "File">"File Information" and the video is now 16 minutes.

I thought, maybe it's an error somewhere but will fix itself after running through VirtualDub. After running video/audio through, I come up with a file that is slower than the DVD, significantly (which likely makes up my 4 minute difference) and the audio is obviously out of sync due to the video being longer.

I've done nothing different than on any other DVD rip. When I watch the DVD in any DVD player, BR player, PS3, PS4....all the deleted scenes play just fine.

Thoughts, suggestions?

I'm likely outta here for the night, but any help over the next couple of days would be appreciated. Thanks!
 

asterixsmeagol

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Well I'm finally trying to attempt my first edit and things have fallen apart immediately. I've ripped a DVD and used PGCdemux to extract the audio and video streams. I also used HeadAC3he to convert the AC3 audio to wave. When I import them into Vegas (14.0) they don't have the same length. They should all be 45:26 (that's what the DVD shows and how the ripped version plays), but when I import the audio it comes in just slightly longer at 45:28:29, and the video comes way too long at 47:21:18. I have no clue what I'm doing wrong, and I don't even know enough about this software to ask the right questions. Someone please take pity on the noob and give me a hint.
 

addiesin

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Sounds like a frame rate problem. Check to make sure your source frame rate and your ripped file's frame rate match. If it's TV from the USA they should both be 29.97fps. if it's PAL region tv they should both be 25fps. If the source and rip don't match, it's possible your ripper allows you to change the frame rate, and it has some unhelpful choice selected by default.
 

Gaith

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Okay, amigos, I'm making a real effort to use Sony Vegas (14 Pro) for the first time, and am riding the struggle bus a bit. I've searched around the forum, and, while there's plenty of info on file converting and such, I can't find any (surviving) instructions on how to make edits themselves, particularly audio transitions - unfortunately, Boon's images in this very thread are dead.

To start with, I'm not even using any disc-derived files; I'm just playing around with an mp4 of a music video. I figured the first thing to practice on was to remove a chorus, which I did using the ol' Womble method of overlapping audio on separate tracks with individual fades in and out. Is there a better way, though? Any fan edit-specific techniques on trimming out extraneous lines/scenes? I searched YT, but there doesn't seem to be much in the way of fan edit-specific tips.

(Also, the whole Vegas interface strikes me as less intuitive/far more slippery than Womble's, though maybe that's just my inexperience talking?)

I'm sure I'll have many more specific questions if I keep at it, but any general time-savers would be greatly appreciated. :)
 

addiesin

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overlapping audio on separate tracks with individual fades in and out. Is there a better way, though? Any fan edit-specific techniques on trimming out extraneous lines/scenes? I searched YT, but there doesn't seem to be much in the way of fan edit-specific tips.

That's pretty much it, there's no magic bullet. Sometimes stuff lines up right and sometimes it doesn't, especially in stereo. You can try to get into the wide worlds of EQ, noise reduction, AI assisted track separation, pitch shifting, and other manipulation and repair tools. Nothing's perfect, exactly, but some can help. Some beginner tips:
1. Test out the different fade "shapes". There's linear, ease, and likely some others. Often linear is the default but I find easing to be a better choice in most cases. I'm not sure about Vegas, it may even let you edit the easing curve manually.
2. If you can, try to go for surround sound. Even with bleed through into the center channel, it's so much easier to edit, and to hide cuts, than stereo. Gives you more options basically.
3. Make sure if you're cutting out a portion of music, you're maintaining the beat as exactly as possible, zoom in to the track for granular control. Being zoomed out most programs will try to snap to arbitrary places in the timeline unless you turn that off, but it's still less control even with that off than if you zoom in.
4. Also with music try to make sure the new transition makes musical sense, but that might be a matter of luck or a matter of cutting slightly more or less to make it sound right with what's available, might not work exactly according to the initial plan, be prepared to improvise.
5. In some cases adding heavy reverb that lasts past the fade on the fading out part can help blend it with the fading in part
 
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Gaith

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Thanks for all that! Given the slipperiness of Vegas's interface, I'm particularly concerned about tracks quietly drifting off sync during the editing process. Wouldn't working with five tracks at once make that even tougher? :p Would the solution be to group all audio tracks together until they're ready to snip?
 

Captain Khajiit

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I figured the first thing to practice on was to remove a chorus, which I did using the ol' Womble method of overlapping audio on separate tracks with individual fades in and out. Is there a better way, though?
That method works. You can also place clips on the same track, drag/push the end of one clip over the beginning of the other, and change the shape of the resulting fade (by clicking on it and selecting the relevant option). This method probably makes the risk of desync less likely, especially if you have video and audio selected simultaneously, because everything is on one track.

For clips that you have already trimmed and positioned on the timeline, you can drag the ends so that material before/after your trim-points re-emerges and can be used for crossfading: this can be done without repositioning the clips themselves, making sync problems less likely. Just make sure that you are not dragging the ends of the clips with a modifier key pressed (I forget which one is the default), because that can stretch the clips (distorting them) ; usually, there is visual feedback when that is what is occurring.

With multiple audio tracks, I would indeed group them unless/until the need arose to adjust them individually. You can even crossfade them all at once.
 
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Gaith

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That method works. You can also place clips on the same track, drag/push the end of one clip over the beginning of the other, and change the shape of the resulting fade (by clicking on it and selecting the relevant option). This method probably makes the risk of desync less likely, especially if you have video and audio selected simultaneously, because everything is on one track.

Er... if you have the audio and video tracks selected simultaneously and do that, you preserve the sync but also get a video crossfade, right? Which rarely works for editing out scenes, and never works for individual lines. But if you make an audio crossfade only, the audio goes off-sync from the video, because crossfading results in a shorter track, while the untouched video remains the original length. Or am I missing something? For that matter, if you're editing, say, five separate audio channels at once, does that mean you need to be fading in and out of ten audio tracks?! :p

If anyone with the know-how and time wouldn't mind making and uploading even a short video on effective dialogue/scene trimming technique to YT, I for one would greatly appreciate it... :)
 

Last Impressions

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Er... if you have the audio and video tracks selected simultaneously and do that, you preserve the sync but also get a video crossfade, right? Which rarely works for editing out scenes, and never works for individual lines. But if you make an audio crossfade only, the audio goes off-sync from the video, because crossfading results in a shorter track, while the untouched video remains the original length. Or am I missing something? For that matter, if you're editing, say, five separate audio channels at once, does that mean you need to be fading in and out of ten audio tracks?! :p

If anyone with the know-how and time wouldn't mind making and uploading even a short video on effective dialogue/scene trimming technique to YT, I for one would greatly appreciate it... :)
Have you used the grouping technique - this is what i do - keep the video in position on the timeline, ungroup all of the audio /or specific audio tracks - make the crossfade by pulling the end of the clip NOT sliding the clip as a whole and then regroup with the video track. The video track will remain shorter and in sync and the surround soundscape/music will crossfade only.

This video may help.

 
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Captain Khajiit

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Er... if you have the audio and video tracks selected simultaneously and do that, you preserve the sync but also get a video crossfade, right?
Yes. but once the fade is in place (and sounds the way you want it to sound), you can deselect the audio and pull the end of the video track back to remove the video crossfade without altering the sync.

For that matter, if you're editing, say, five separate audio channels at once, does that mean you need to be fading in and out of ten audio tracks?! :p
With the method that you associate with Womble, yes. When overlapping the clips on the same track, there are only five audio tracks, and you can group them so the same fade is applied to each. For 5.1, some people use W64/RF64 instead of six mono wavs, which means that you have fewer tracks to juggle.
 
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Gaith

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Thank you both, that's quite helpful. :)
 
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