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Wonky Image

Vengeance

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I have just been trying to rip Star Trek: The Motion Picture, and when I watched it through, I realised that the image was, well, wonky. Take a look at this:

suluoj7.jpg


This is just a small example, but the lines around Sulu keep happening at different times, and with more lines.

Is there anyway I can fix this?

Thanks,

Dan
 

boon23

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a deinterlace filter can help there.
 

DoctorM

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Um, is your source PAL or NTSC?
If NTSC make sure you remove the pulldown flags.
 

Vengeance

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Boon, you're a life saver!

What is it? Where do I find it? How do I use it in conjunction with my DVD Ripper?

Thanks,

Dan
 

boon23

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that is a lot of questions...
the deinterlacing has to be used when the conversion to your movie s done. It can be done with virtual dub or avisynth. If you frameserve, it is easy, because you just add the filter. If you don't, you might need to use an encoder like TMPG, which has a de-interlacer or use the new divx version, which also has a built in deinterlacer.
Still you should experiment with the image quality, there are various options how to deinterlace and still receive the best possible image quality.
 

Jaiman Tuckuh

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How did you get these images? If you edited normal PAL-from-Film, and then saved at 30 fps, you would get this interlacing.

For that case, or NTSC, DoctorM is right, it should only need the pulldown flags removed with the dgpulldown utility.

Did you save this footage from an editor? Which one?

I would think you'd have the PAL DVD, which is very disturbing... I hope the PAL version of the Extra's Disc isn't screwed up like the R2 Serenity Movie's Extra's Disc... That would mean they took a hard-interlaced NTSC, de-interlaced it to 25 fps (throwing away 5 fps), instead of IVTC, and then resized it to PAL - which is inexcusable and impossible to repair properly. In that case, Boon's advice is correct. (But the results will not have fluid motion, because they botched it).

The PAL should have one of two things:
1) 2 extra fields per second (no PAL speedup).
2) No extra fields, but sped up (24 fps speeded up to 25 fps - resulting in the "chipmunk effect" on the voices).


Boon's advice is meant for Camcorder footage, where the source is recorded one field at a time. That is where you use "Deinterlace".

Film footage should only have duplicate fields - and you would want to remove those with "IVTC" ("Inverse Telecine"). Deinterlace would be the wrong way to remove interlacing from Film-sourced material. Except in cases of botched NTSC->PAL conversions.


Proper DVD's. made from film sources, do not store the interlacing, they use "pulldown flags" which tell the DVD player to add extra fields.

Sometimes PAL DVDs are made from NTSC "Telecined" sources (film telecined with extra fields added during the scanning - "hard interlaced"). Telecined sources are meant for making Laserdiscs and Videotapes. Another case is workprint footage (which can be saved in videotape format, with the interlacing). And, finally, fan productions can be recorded from broadcast, and saved with the extra fields were broadcast. But none of that should apply to the Trek Movie extras discs.
 

RADiX

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I would think you'd have the PAL DVD, which is very disturbing... I hope the PAL version of the Extra's Disc isn't screwed up like the R2 Serenity Movie's Extra's Disc... That would mean they took a hard-interlaced NTSC, de-interlaced it to 25 fps (throwing away 5 fps), instead of IVTC, and then resized it to PAL - which is inexcusable and impossible to repair properly. In that case, Boon's advice is correct. (But the results will not have fluid motion, because they botched it).

Yup the PAL star trek extras were proper botched with that very method.
 
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