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What's the purpose of converting DTS to wav?

asterixsmeagol

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Sorry to go off topic a bit, but what's the purpose of converting DTS to wav?
I ask as somebody who has not ever completed a real edit of IFDB quality.
 

M4_

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asterixsmeagol said:
Sorry to go off topic a bit, but what's the purpose of converting DTS to wav?
I ask as somebody who has not ever completed a real edit of IFDB quality.

Commercial movies use professional codecs for their audio, you probably hear all the time about 'dts' and 'dolby digital' and so these audio types can be great purposes of compression (making the audio file take up less space) and also delivering high quality (and sometimes lossless quality like DTS-HD Master Audio which is what the standard Hobbit blu-rays had). The problem is that this audio is for consumers, you can't load it into Adobe Premiere, and most other editors. So to get around this, I take the original DTS and convert it to something Premiere will read. I could do a variety of formats - ac3, aac, mp3, m4a, wav, etc. I choose wav because it's lossless (there is no quality loss when converting) and I just overall prefer it. Then 24 bit because the DTS-HD Master Audio is 24 bit as well, so no reason to go down to 16.

Sorry for the in depth explanation, but I really do love audio and think the future of fan editing needs to put more attention to it, most people re-encode their audio multiple times, use lossy formats while editing, but if you really want your fan edit to have basically identical audio to the blu-ray disc, it's totally possible and worth it.
 
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