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What does everyone use for their disc art?

Kevinicus

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I used to have a program with my printer that let me design disc art, but I haven't used it in years so it's not installed. And even then I'm not sure it would let me save my design as a .jpg or anything.

Is there any simple free program for this?
 

ThrowgnCpr

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are you looking for a program to print the disc, or just create the disc art?
 

Rogue-theX

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I always use GIMP and throw's cover art pack.

http://www.gimp.org/

Tho i am fairly certain kevinicus has a fine image manipulator allready. So i assume this is for printing the disc art, witch i would like to know how to do. can anyone recommend a reliable method/materials-equipment to do so.
 

elbarto1

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well if you use throws templates for the disc/ameray you can print directly from photoshop so i would assume gimp would allow the same basic export.
materials - heavier stock paper w/ a gloss or straight photo paper looks best in my experience.
regular old white printer paper will look like crap though.
 

Rogue-theX

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Na, sorry elbatro1, i meant how to print the disc art. I'm fine with the cover art, i just don't know about printing the disc.
 

elbarto1

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do you mean a adhesive label, or using printer ready (white top) discs?
or lightscribe?
 

Rogue-theX

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Honestly i have no idea. What would you recommend?
 

reave

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Rogue-theX said:
Honestly i have no idea. What would you recommend?

NOT using the adhesive labels. I made that mistake long ago. I later learned that as the labels age, they can start getting gummy around the edges, and begin to pull off (due the heat in the player, I would assume). They can also throw the balance of a disc off, which can actually get worse as some parts of the label wear off and the weight balance is further skewed.

In a nutshell, DON'T DO IT.

I would highly recommend a printer with disc printing capabilities, if you want to have nice looking discs. Lightscribe is fine, but really not worth the crap discs you have to buy.

I believe that I have an Epson disc printing printer, but i'm too tired to walk downstairs to see. It works great on the Verbatim white-label discs that I always use, printed disc or not.
 

theslime

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GIMP (with a cover template) is the best way of making disc art (unless you shell out for Photoshop, which isn't really BETTER, only with a better interface.)

I love GIMP so much, I want to take it out behind the middle school and make it pregnant.
 

Rogue-theX

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theslime said:
GIMP (with a cover template) is the best way of making disc art (unless you shell out for Photoshop, which isn't really BETTER, only with a better interface.)

I love GIMP so much, I want to take it out behind the middle school and make it pregnant.

You want to get a middle school gimp pregnant? Oh i don't like where this is going.
 

Rogue-theX

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:eek: That's even worse :lol: :lol: :lol:
Roflmfao!!!
 

ThrowgnCpr

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reave said:
Rogue-theX said:
Honestly i have no idea. What would you recommend?

NOT using the adhesive labels. I made that mistake long ago. I later learned that as the labels age, they can start getting gummy around the edges, and begin to pull off (due the heat in the player, I would assume). They can also throw the balance of a disc off, which can actually get worse as some parts of the label wear off and the weight balance is further skewed.

In a nutshell, DON'T DO IT.

I would highly recommend a printer with disc printing capabilities, if you want to have nice looking discs. Lightscribe is fine, but really not worth the crap discs you have to buy.

I believe that I have an Epson disc printing printer, but i'm too tired to walk downstairs to see. It works great on the Verbatim white-label discs that I always use, printed disc or not.

^^ the man speaks the truth. NO adhesive labels. None, whatsoever. I'm still amazed that companies sell the things. They ruin your discs. I also use white printable discs 99% of the time, even though I rarely print labels on them.

Photoshop or GIMP to design the art (you'll find a template in my cover art tutorial). As theSlime wrote, GIMP will do most things PS can do, but imo, the interface sucks. I don't think GIMP can hold up to a lot of the things that are new in Photoshop CS5 either (content-aware, powerful HDR, lots of 3D capabilities). ..but most of that isn't necessary for simple disc art.


based on the interface, I'd say love-making with GIMP is just awkward and uncomfortable. PS is a smooth ride all the way :-D cue the music...
 

theslime

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content-aware
If you're thinking about content-aware fill, that's basically the years-old GIMP resynthesizer plugin - only hyped and renamed to something understandable.

Resynthesizer in action:
[youtube:102he77o]

If you mean content-aware scaling (which Adobe bought from some company for the CS4 version), I don't know GIMP well enough to think of a similar function. But I wouldn't be surprised if it's there, considering Resynthesizer existed under people's noses for several years before everyone starting screaming MAGIC at the Photoshop fill function.
 

ThrowgnCpr

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the_more_you_know2.jpg

(lets see how many times I can use this image today)


If only GIMP would improve their interface, I think they might be serious competition for Adobe.
 

Ghostcut

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This screenshot is from a beta version of The GIMP, in single-window mode.



I'd say that's an improvement.
 

theslime

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Definitely! Looking good. I haven't been paying attention to the beta releases, but I guess I should.

Sidenote: Beta releases of open source software are often the best. They're usually completely stable (open source developers mostly save their unstable releases for alpha versions), and betas often come with new great functions that are almost obsolete (or at least old hat) when the actual release happens. Three applications that come to mind are Scribus, Audacity, and Cog (music player for OSX). RawTherapee (cross platform raw photo developer) is even stable in its alpha version (and much better than the stable version).
 
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