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Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me - Teresa Banks and the Last Seven Days of Laura Palmer

ReddinoX

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i would be interested in those...When you think to complete the italian subs?


xassenn said:
Hi. I'd like to thank Q2 for his GREAT JOB.
I loved it! Thank you very, very much!

I'm working on italian subtitles for this fanedit, if someone is interested in.
It's not a simple job, because I found out that original subs from the movie are not always right. I found that many sentences were translated very approximately, and not always properly. Too many simplifications. I am trying to made the subs as perfect as possibile.

Yes, but... In the "pink room" scene, what the hell does is mean "DON'T EXPECT A TURKEY DOG HERE"??? It is slang?? Can anyone help me about this?
 

xassenn

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Thank you for the explications about turkey dogs... It's very hard to find a translation to adapt this sentence to my language!

ReddinoX said:
i would be interested in those...When you think to complete the italian subs?

I will finish in a few days, next week.
Are you an italian speaker? Or you are interested in the syncronization to create subs for other languages?

I have some trouble to translate "I am the Great Went". I read this interview, that doesn't help me:

TPA: Did Lynch give you any idea of the meaning behind lines like that or ‘I am The Great Went’?
WO: I asked David what it meant. He told me ‘It means whatever you want it to mean.’
(http://twinpeaksarchive.blogspot.it/2008/01/exclusive-walter-olkewicz-interview.html)

Some problem also when Jack says: "Don't take it any further than that". What does it mean?

Can you help me?
 

regularjoe

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I always interpreted the line "I am the Great Went" to be a reference about being drugged out of his head.
 

ReddinoX

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"Non prenderne di piu'" or "non prenderne piu di cosi"

Some problem also when Jack says: "Don't take it any further than that". What does it mean?

Can you help me?[/QUOTE]
 

Q2

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ReddinoX said:
Some problem also when Jack says: "Don't take it any further than that".

Basically, don't ask any other questions regarding that subject.
 

theslime

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The reference is to the song Goodnight Irene, meaning Irene is sick of hearing song-related jokes about her name. Jack warns that they should stop before making the joke.
 

vpops

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Amazing extended edition! I only had one issue.

Shooting Script said:
Jacques lifts Donna up and Laura follows Jacques and Donna out of Partyland. Donna continues to mumble.

DONNA
I won't wear your stuff.
(then laughing)
I promise.


(CONTINUED)


**


August 8, 1991 85.


136. CONTINUED: (3)

LAURA
(crying, holding Donna's hand)
Not you, Donna, not you.

137. EXT. TWIN PEAKS CHURCH - SUNDAY MORNING

On the screen it reads:

"SUNDAY - FOUR DAYS BEFORE"

FOLKS filing out of church. A COUPLE strolling down the sidewalk.
A happy dog bounds about.

***UNSHOT SCENES***

141. INT. MOTEL ROOM - DAY

PHILIP GERARD, the one armed man, in a deep sweat kneels in front of
a circle of twelve lit candles, fighting for air and struggling to
hear something.

142. INT. HAYWARD HOUSE, LIVING ROOM - DAY
Donna and Laura sit across from one another on the couch.

Maybe it would work best to leave the transition into Sunday from the original movie (with the trees), then fade into Philip Gerard and then the church shot. The way it is in this extended version feels abrupt. Probably the only rough edit in the whole thing. Not a big deal.
 

xassenn

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theslime said:
The reference is to the song Goodnight Irene, meaning Irene is sick of hearing song-related jokes about her name. Jack warns that they should stop before making the joke.

Very interesting!! Thank you very much!

I used to think that Jack wanted to warn that they shouldn't ask her too many questions about the kill of Teresa... but I wasn't sure, because it sounded very strange... Why Jack should say that to an FBI agent?

So, for you is the line "There's nothing good about it" referred to the song-related joke about her name? I mean, "about it" is "about the joke"? Or does it means "There's nothing good about this murder"? It is important to me, because it can help me to translate properly.

The "turkey dog" line is very hard to translate to my language. The reference to hot dogs, "normal" and "turkey" hot dogs is not very familiar. I have to make a choice. Have I to think up a similar sentence in my language, a free translation? Or has it to be literal? I wish to be literal whenever is possibile, but it is not always possible!

"The Great Went" isn't very simple to translate to italian. I understand the "feeling" you can feel behind this line, but it is not simple to translate. You know, in original italian theatrical version of FWWM, it was "Io non sono Jacques, sono un soffio di vento" (= I'm not Jacques, I'm a breath of wind)... Maybe nice, but not a faithful translation, in my opinion.

Thank you, all of you, for helping me.

I hope to finish my work by Thursday!
 

theslime

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It's definitely about the song. It was a huge hit in 1950 (with The Weavers), and Irene would have been a kid then, making it a constant in her life that people reference the song when they say goodnight. In the script Stanley says "Thank God it's morning" because then they won't have to say the title when they say goodbye.

I don't think Jack minds that they ask questions about Teresa.
 

Q2

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This was good trivia I didn't know. Thanks for sharing theslime.
 

theslime

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My pleasure! And I'm happy we're having this script discussion. There are some head-scratchers in the script, for sure.

In particular, the druggy dialogue of the Partyland/Power and the Glory scenes results in some puzzling lines. I take "Don't expect a turkey dog here" to mean not just "don't expect bar food", but rather "don't expect the slightly healthier type of hot dog". I.e. this is not a health-conscious place. (Also: Guess what? There's no tomorrow.) I'm not American, so I may be way off in thinking there's a health implication to the turkey, though. "I'm the Great Went" and "blank as a fart" is just Jacques showing off his otherwise little-known postmodernist poet side. The Great Went sounds like a kind of Dada circus performer (who's already "gone"), while blank as a fart implies (to me) that he's loaded/high and in a grimy, smelly place. Like a surrealist fart joke. I take it Lynch and Engels wanted to create some non-cliched drug ramblings that fit the dreamy tone of the rest of the film, and Jacques's lines in particular (also, Laura's "I'm the muffin" repetition is great) are really great, in my opinion.

By the way, is there a consensus about what the bellhop in Buenos Aires really says? Since he's shouting it's impossible for me to tell if he says "Ayúdame!" (help me) or "Are you the man?!" The subtitles for the Missing Pieces says "Are you the man", but they're not always 100 percent correct, and the line isn't in the script. EDIT: "Ayudame" makes a lot more sense than "Are you the man" (which seems like it's coming completely out of left field; what man?), but knowing that Lynch likes vaguely ominous lines where people point out identities - the repeated "This is the girl" (Mulholland dr.); "Who do you think that is there?" (FWWM); "It looked like you, but it wasn't" (Lost Highway) - I'm inclined to believe the subtitles anyway.
 

xassenn

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theslime said:
In particular, the druggy dialogue of the Partyland/Power and the Glory scenes results in some puzzling lines. I take "Don't expect a turkey dog here" to mean not just "don't expect bar food", but rather "don't expect the slightly healthier type of hot dog". I.e. this is not a health-conscious place. (Also: Guess what? There's no tomorrow.) I'm not American, so I may be way off in thinking there's a health implication to the turkey, though. "I'm the Great Went" and "blank as a fart" is just Jacques showing off his otherwise little-known postmodernist poet side. The Great Went sounds like a kind of Dada circus performer (who's already "gone"), while blank as a fart implies (to me) that he's loaded/high and in a grimy, smelly place. Like a surrealist fart joke. I take it Lynch and Engels wanted to create some non-cliched drug ramblings that fit the dreamy tone of the rest of the film, and Jacques's lines in particular (also, Laura's "I'm the muffin" repetition is great) are really great, in my opinion.

By the way, is there a consensus about what the bellhop in Buenos Aires really says? Since he's shouting it's impossible for me to tell if he says "Ayúdame!" (help me) or "Are you the man?!" The subtitles for the Missing Pieces says "Are you the man", but they're not always 100 percent correct, and the line isn't in the script. EDIT: "Ayudame" makes a lot more sense than "Are you the man" (which seems like it's coming completely out of left field; what man?), but knowing that Lynch likes vaguely ominous lines where people point out identities - the repeated "This is the girl" (Mulholland dr.); "Who do you think that is there?" (FWWM); "It looked like you, but it wasn't" (Lost Highway) - I'm inclined to believe the subtitles anyway.

Your comments are very, very interesting. I agree about the dialogue in the Pink Room. Jacques is doped up, excited and inspired by drugs and his delusions are poetic in their own way. He is doing a little show for his friends.

The line "Hey, slow pokes" now became clear because in the previous scene someone says "Jacques beat us here." Jacques is the first one to get to Canada from the Roadhouse. I had not realized it before. I realized it after seeing the scene of the girls in the car with the truckers.

I also agree about the "turkey dog" line. I think that Laura wants to say "do not expect something light, something healthy"... "this is not a place for anyone who is concerned about the health".

I am almost certain that in Buenos Aires the bellboy screams "Ayudame." This word is also in Spanish subtitles ... and I think it is much more logical rather than "are you the man?". The bellman is simply terrified (he pooped on himself), and then he calls for help. It would be possible, "are you the man?", only if the bellman was aware of the existence of "spirits" from another world (like Bob and the litlle man), but nothing suggests that.

Very interesting the reference to the song "Goodnight Irene." Very interesting and indisputable. There is also a reference in a later scene, because when the dawn came and agents salute and thank Irene in the parking lot, they (both) stop while they're saying "Good ...". Not to say "Goodnight" to Irene (she is going to sleep), they say to her: "Good... morning" (since it's early morning).

There is still one thing I do not quite understand. I need your help one more time. What does Big Ed says, when he is with Norma into the truck? "We could not get any warmer," the subtitles say. But I do not quite understand what it means. I need an explication. Maybe I understand "I could not get any warmer." Does he mean that he has been drinking a lot? I do not understand the meaning of this line.
 

xassenn

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I wrote a long post to reply to theslime. The post is waiting to be approved by a moderator.
I don't think I wrote something weird. I didn't break the rules... Why this? If a post is long, does it need approvation by a mod?
 

theslime

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You're probably right about the bellhop. I guess I liked the idea that he's somehow aware of things despite the lack of indications otherwise. The precedent would be Carl Rodd, who's "gone places" (another unscripted line). But you're probably right.

I've only watched the edit once, so I can't remember what Ed says to Norma. I'll check tomorrow, and get back to you.
 

Frey

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Absolutely fantastic Edit. Very few scenes that felt abrupt or too out of place. I suppose that sentiment is pretty much par for the course with your stuff though.
 

TV's Frink

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[MENTION=30508]ugur51[/MENTION] your post has been moderated. Read The Rules.
 

Saucy jacks

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Hi, this looks fantastic, I'm new to Fan Edit, where is this available for downlioad?
 
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