• Most new users don't bother reading our rules. Here's the one that is ignored almost immediately upon signup: DO NOT ASK FOR FANEDIT LINKS PUBLICLY. First, read the FAQ. Seriously. What you want is there. You can also send a message to the editor. If that doesn't work THEN post in the Trade & Request forum. Anywhere else and it will be deleted and an infraction will be issued.
  • If this is your first time here please read our FAQ and Rules pages. They have some useful information that will get us all off on the right foot. More details on our policies, especially our Own the Source rule are available here. If you do not understand any of these rules send a private message to one of our staff for further details.
  • Fan Edit Of The Year (FEOTY) 2021: and the WINNERS are...! here Congratulations!

My year with Tarzan

Garp

Well-known member
Messages
1,016
Reaction score
88
Trophy Points
53
BONUS: 'Killer Leopard'

Bomba half-heartedly tracks a potentially lethal leopard, while getting entangled in a married woman's affairs.

This is another of those mix of plots, but one that works rather well. A leopard mauls a native and now has a taste for human blood. Bomba is assigned to kill it, but really this is a subplot for the larger and frankly more interesting story. An American is in Africa, looking for a guide who doesn't ask too many questions. Later, his wife turns up, looking to bring the man home. The mystery is set up well early on, and the story is teased out organically.

As such, this isn't really a Bomba film. Sheffield, looking even more like a man than a boy, is sidelined for much of the story as we catch up with a host of character actors. The story has a number of interesting twists, but still a fair amount of stock footage and recycled scenes from previous films to remind you that it is actually a Bomba film. Compared to other Bomba films, and seeing how late in the series this was, 'Killer Leopard' was a pleasant surprise.
 

bionicbob

Well-known member
Donor
Faneditor
Messages
7,350
Reaction score
853
Trophy Points
168

With TARZAN'S GREATEST ADVENTURE, you have entered my favourite era of Apeman adventures.

While it is still not quite ERB's Jungle Lord, it is significantly closer. There is no Jane in this era. No Greystoke history. But the character of Tarzan himself is much closer in tone to the books. It is helped by edgier, grittier stories and on location exotic locals. As the movies go on, Tarzan sort of becomes a global troubleshooter... going from one jungle to another to help a friend or solve a mystery; something he did often in the later books.

As for TGA specifically, it is essentially a Western manhunt story. And it does it brilliantly. It is an incredible, exciting and refreshing reboot for the franchise. It is the movie I always suggest to anyone who has never seen a Tarzan adventure for their first experience with the King of the Jungle.
 

Dwight Fry

Well-known member
Faneditor
Messages
3,823
Reaction score
912
Trophy Points
123

With TARZAN'S GREATEST ADVENTURE, you have entered my favourite era of Apeman adventures.

While it is still not quite ERB's Jungle Lord, it is significantly closer. There is no Jane in this era. No Greystoke history. But the character of Tarzan himself is much closer in tone to the books. It is helped by edgier, grittier stories and on location exotic locals. As the movies go on, Tarzan sort of becomes a global troubleshooter... going from one jungle to another to help a friend or solve a mystery; something he did often in the later books.

As for TGA specifically, it is essentially a Western manhunt story. And it does it brilliantly. It is an incredible, exciting and refreshing reboot for the franchise. It is the movie I always suggest to anyone who has never seen a Tarzan adventure for their first experience with the King of the Jungle.
I've been lurking around this thread without posting as there are so many of these movies I have seen MANY years ago, and so many I have never seen... but when we get to this, I must definitely chime in, as I consider it the best Tarzan movie I have ever seen. However, it must be said that its greatness comes more from the villains than from Tarzan himself. The baddies, headlined by Quayle and Connery, just steal the show completely, and Tarzan almost feels like more of a plot device than a character. I tend to think that if it was all about the bad guys and the Lord of the Jungle didn't even show up, it would have been almost as interesting a film. In that sense, would it really be a good introduction to the character for a newbie? Hmmm...
 

MusicEd921

Well-known member
Donor
Faneditor
Messages
1,802
Reaction score
432
Trophy Points
113
It is the movie I always suggest to anyone who has never seen a Tarzan adventure for their first experience with the King of the Jungle.

I can account for this! You definitely suggested this to me a few years ago when we chatted about my preparations to see The Legend of Tarzan!
 

bionicbob

Well-known member
Donor
Faneditor
Messages
7,350
Reaction score
853
Trophy Points
168
I've been lurking around this thread without posting as there are so many of these movies I have seen MANY years ago, and so many I have never seen... but when we get to this, I must definitely chime in, as I consider it the best Tarzan movie I have ever seen. However, it must be said that its greatness comes more from the villains than from Tarzan himself. The baddies, headlined by Quayle and Connery, just steal the show completely, and Tarzan almost feels like more of a plot device than a character. I tend to think that if it was all about the bad guys and the Lord of the Jungle didn't even show up, it would have been almost as interesting a film. In that sense, would it really be a good introduction to the character for a newbie? Hmmm...

I think it works mostly well as an intro. Granted it is not an origin story, but I think you get a good sense of Tarzan as a character. His sense of honor. His savagery.

Is he mostly reactive? Yes. But so was Tarzan in many of the novels. A hero is defined by his villains, and I whole heartedly agree, this movie has some of the best ones ever. (y) 😁
 

Garp

Well-known member
Messages
1,016
Reaction score
88
Trophy Points
53
Week 31: 'Tarzan the Magnificent' [1960]

In trying to bring a killer to justice, Tarzan is pursued by the killer's bloodthirsty family.

'Tarzan the Magnificent' carries on the cat-and-mouse games so successfully seen in 'Tarzan's Greatest Adventure'. This time, it's the apeman himself who is the prey. Killer Coy Banton (Jock Mahoney) is captured, but no one in town wants to take charge of him until the boat arrives to take him to meet his fate at the gallows. They fear the wrath of his murderous family (headed by John Carradine). Mirroring 'High Noon', Tarzan has to deal with the family by himself. However, he is lumbered with a disparate group who have become stranded - including a pompous official (Lionel Jeffries) and an ex-doctor (Charles Tingwell), making his journey more arduous.

After the high bar set by 'Tarzan's Greatest Adventure', anything else afterwards is going to seem a disappointment. 'Tarzan the Magnificent' is a good film and had it preceded 'TGA' I would have praised it more highly. But there is a sense of sameness here - trying to capture lightning in a bottle a second time. The villains are not so fleshed out, and some of the supporting characters are dead weight. The action scenes are well done - especially the climax atop a waterfall - and Tarzan has one of the better introductions on screen; we don't see him for several minutes, just his arrows as they thwack into people and/or trees.

The film proudly states in the opening credits that it was filmed entirely in Africa, and it looks good. Local tribes are used, adding to the sense of authenticity. This was Scott's last film as the Lord of the Jungle, and his successor, very aptly, was Jock Mahoney, his antagonist here. Mahoney gets to show his action chops in 'Tarzan the Magnificent', but he is otherwise quiet and brooding, not giving us much of an idea of how his apeman will be played. Still, I'm sorry to see Scott go. He was a breath of fresh air after a lacklustre Lex Barker, and he showed in these final two films that he wasn't just an abnormally well-built lunk.
 

bionicbob

Well-known member
Donor
Faneditor
Messages
7,350
Reaction score
853
Trophy Points
168
Gordon Scott born on this day, August 3, 1926.


Again, really enjoy this flick! Not as good as TGA, but none are.
But as a follow up, perfectly solid and entertaining.
I like the slow burn tension building and the final climax on the waterfall is a worthy pay-off.
With these last two outings, Scott was able to bring a real grittiness and edge to the role that was previously lacking. And while other good Tarzans would follow, none of them every quite re-captured that quiet savagery.
 

Garp

Well-known member
Messages
1,016
Reaction score
88
Trophy Points
53
BONUS: 'Lord of the Jungle' [1955]

A herd of elephants is rampaging through villages. The government send a group of hunters to kill them all, but Bomba believes that only one rogue elephant is to blame.

This is the last of the Bomba films, and the franchise goes out on neither a bang nor a whimper (but perhaps closer to the latter than the former). The Bomba films never had the strongest of plots, but 'Lord of the Jungle' has a thin story stretched so much to reach 69 minutes that it's a wonder the filmstock didn't snap. Bomba spends much of the time trying to persuade the hunters, the returning Commissioner Barnes (Leonard Mudie) and the radioed-in voice of the government to allow him to seek and destroy the troublesome pachyderm. Most of the action happens off-screen, with characters relaying scenes of devastation the budget didn't allow to film. We do get recycled footage, of course, of elephants getting into mischief, and perhaps a nod to Sheffield's former role with some underwater scenes of him swimming with this week's leading lady. Nancy Hale plays Barnes' feisty niece Mona, and for a moment there it looked as though Bomba would end his years of stringing girls along and settle down. But no, he's just there to confuse the poor maiden before she comes to her senses and returns to her unseen beau Lewis.

Despite its many flaws, 'Lord of the Jungle' is another cosy inoffensive offering, doing just enough to send Bomba off again into the jungle with his trusty spear and familiar wave to the camera. Johnny Sheffield had one last try on screen (the small one this time), which I'll be reviewing next week, before retiring at the ripe old age of 24. Wikipedia has a short section on his post-Hollywood careers (including importing lobsters); he died from a heart attack following a fall from a ladder whilst pruning a palm tree in 2010. Farewell, Boy and Bomba.
 

Dwight Fry

Well-known member
Faneditor
Messages
3,823
Reaction score
912
Trophy Points
123
This was Scott's last film as the Lord of the Jungle, and his successor, very aptly, was Jock Mahoney, his antagonist here.
Famously, Sean Connery was invited back after TGA for the next film, and he replied that he would be unavailable because he had been cast in "some spy movie". "But", he said, "I'll be in your next". Which makes one think: Had Dr. No bombed, would Connery have ended up playing the Lord of the Apesh eventually?
 

bionicbob

Well-known member
Donor
Faneditor
Messages
7,350
Reaction score
853
Trophy Points
168
The name is Clayton. John Clayton.

or would it be,
Tarzan. Me Tarzan.
😂

Hard for me to imagine Connery as the Apeman, though he certainly had the physique for it, but maybe not the hair lol.
 

Garp

Well-known member
Messages
1,016
Reaction score
88
Trophy Points
53
Week 32: 'Tarzan goes to India' [1962]

Disclaimer: In my late 20s, I spent many months in India, probably totaling over a year. It's not an exaggeration to say that the experience changed my life, and I have a heartfelt fondness for all things Indian as a result. Therefore, I may be more favorable towards this film than it actually deserves.

After playing the villain in the previous 'Tarzan the Magnificent', Jock Mahoney takes over the lead here in 'Tarzan goes to India' and has a pretty good introduction. Bare-chested, flying over an Indian lake in a bi-plane, he dives in and swims ashore - a James Bond move several months before the release of 'Dr. No'. The plot of the film is not unlike that of the last Bomba film 'Lord of the Jungle' [1955]: a rogue elephant has riled up a herd of rampaging elephants. Tarzan believes he can kill the troublemaker and save the rest. Mixed in with this is a dam that is nearing completion, which will flood the surrounding area and drown the elephants unless Tarzan can rescue them. The ticking clock is set.

Mahoney portrays an older, leaner and more thoughtful Tarzan, which is unusual but not uninteresting. His Tarzan also climbs a tree to avoid a cobra, gets captured (twice!) and needs saving from a leopard attack even while wielding a chain. Not quite the heroics we're used to. Still, it felt like Tarzan wasn't the star of the film, but that the wonderful locations, hundreds of extras and dozens of elephants were. India looks terrific here - you can almost smell it - and sets (which were mostly all destroyed at one point or another by the dozens of elephants) were impressive.

Another draw is the villain Bryce, played by Leo Gordon. Tarzan has come across many ruthless explorers, poachers, guides and businessmen before, but Bryce is a special kind of bastard. The film is better with him in it, and it's a shame the writers decided to shuffle him offscreen two-thirds of the way through. Also worth mentioning is Jai the Elephant Boy as the chirpy orphan and a pseudo-Boy, if you like.

Overall, 'Tarzan goes to India' gave me a whiff of nostalgia, and that was enough for me.
 

Garp

Well-known member
Messages
1,016
Reaction score
88
Trophy Points
53
BONUS: 'Bantu the Zebra Boy' [TV] [1956]

Johnny Sheffield couldn't quite let go of the jungle after his string of films as Tarzan's Boy and later Bomba the Jungle Boy. Thus his father created and directed him in a TV pilot called 'Bantu the Zebra Boy', who is Bomba in all but name. The main differences are that Bantu wears a zebra-skin loincloth, rides a zebra instead of an elephant, and doesn't string any young maidens along - at least, not in this solo episode. (In fact, there are no women to be seen at all.)

The plot of this 25 minute episode is an amalgam of many Bomba and Jungle Jim stories, featuring evil witch doctors, a secret diamond mine, a tribal prince who would be king, and a double-crossing explorer. This is not a Bantu origin story - we aren't given any reason as to why Bantu is in Africa nor why he has befriended zebras (even Bomba was given a backstory in his opening films) - but maybe that was a mystery that would have been explored if 'Bantu' had ever been picked up by a TV company. As such, it's a one-off and, despite some relatively high production values (the sets and costumes look good, and I'm sure it's not cheap to keep a trained zebra), it's not hard to see why we never saw Bantu on the small screen. Unfortunately, like his previous co-star Johnny Weissmuller, Johnny Sheffield had charisma and screen presence, but was not great at delivering lines.

The more interesting aspect of this episode is the hard sell at the end to potential sponsors. The actor who plays the Commissioner (yes, like Bomba, there is an English Commissioner here) highlights Bantu's special bracelet, which Bantu flips over a couple of times in the show. Apparently it's a visual affirmation of him beginning to do a good deed, and then again when it is completed. (The unspoken nudge is that this bracelet could become prized kiddie merchandise.) Sheffield then addresses the camera himself, introducing his zebra and hoping that he will be working with the sponsors real soon. Alas, it was not to be.
 

bionicbob

Well-known member
Donor
Faneditor
Messages
7,350
Reaction score
853
Trophy Points
168

For me, this is a weaker entry in the Weintraub era. It is still very entertaining, but after the previous two TGA and TTM, this feels a bit more like a throw back to earlier times. But as @Garp wonderfully expounded, the location work is gorgeous and really elevates the material.

And Jock Mahoney as Tarzan? He is fine in this first outing. Easily, the most seasoned and experienced actor to assume the role thus far in the franchise. Though his performance is more American Cowboy than African Lord, which reflects his long career playing such western roles.
 
Top Bottom