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A few reviews

TM2YC

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Chernobyl (2019)
This is even better on the 2nd viewing. I spotted lots of little subtle looks and meaningful lines I missed first time around. To avoid spoilers I opted to not listen to the weekly podcast by writer/creator Craig Mazin on my first watch, despite people raving about it, but this time I choose to listen to it along side each episode. Mazin goes into detail about what was changed for simplicity, or for drama, what true things were left out because they were frankly unbelievable and discuses conflicting accounts of events and his decisions on which to believe. You get the sense that Mazin intended 'Chernobyl' as his lifelong passion-project, his big chance to take risks, to write as he always wanted, to say everything he's wanted to say, with no concessions to simple "Hollywood" screenwriting cliches. If I had to criticise this modern masterpiece... there is too much crucial runtime devoted to Barry Keoghan's character going around shooting dogs in episode 4. It's the one time when it feels like we aren't experiencing the vast totality of the disaster and are just stopping to focus too long on some fictional character's personal experience (we don't really get to know any other liquidators). 'Chernobyl' is so good that I'll have to stop myself immediately spending another 5-hours watching it for a 3rd time. Patience, give it a couple of months at least ;) .





Chernobyl: Abyss aka Chernobyl 1986 (2021)
This new Russian made Chernobyl disaster movie turned up on Netflix just after I'd rewatched the HBO/Sky mini-series. Danila Kozlovsky directs and casts himself as the hero with the brilliant Oksana Akinshina (from 2020's 'Sputnik') as his estranged lover. The concept of it being about entirely fictional characters sounded dubious. It does start very strong with an interesting outsider perspective on the disaster, giving us a flavour of what everyday life might have been like in Pripyat. The FX and production details aren't too far off the celebrated mini-series and the relationship between the two main characters is well played and believable. As the disaster escalates it unfortunately becomes increasingly preposterous, finding endless excuses to somehow have Kozlovsky's character at the center of nearly everything. No explanation is given for the "accident", or any blame apportioned, with one character saying "does it matter" how this happened? Er, yeah just a bit.

 

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The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus (1968)
Mick Jagger's
idea of doing a "far out" circus film for the BBC incorporating Rock band performances, elderly actual circus acts, improvised shenanigans and him as the costumed ring-master probably sounded brilliant when he was high, less brilliant when he was coming down during the shoot and faintly embarrassing when he was stone cold sober in the editing booth. The film was never broadcast as planned in 1968 and only got released in 1996, then given a stunning 4K remaster in 2019. The most common rumour I'd heard for it being shelved was The Rolling Stones being upstaged by The Who (which they are), although Brian Jones' death soon after is one of other possible reasons. The good news is that the 12 performances by The Stones "and friends" are all fantastic... I was even digging Yoko's number. My highlight was Taj Mahal's gritty version of 'Ain't That A Lot Of Love. The "groovy" circus linking material is bad and it's made worse because you can see from their puzzled eyes that everybody knows it's bad... except for Pete Townshend who is laughing at the whole thing. Most, if not all the songs from the film have officially been put up on youtube in 4K. So you might be as well just watching those rather than the actual film, although my curiosity to finally see this 60s period oddity in-full was well satisfied.




 

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The Mercedes Killer by Maniac

I had the very rare pleasure of seeing this edit, not only before it was actually released but… drumroll…before watching the series that it was based on, Mr. Mercedes.

Sure, I was familiar with the premise…based on a work by the one and only Stephen King, the story centers on Bill Hodges, a man who left his native Ireland (love that accent) as a teenager and became a cop in the small town of Bridgton, Ohio. After several years of service, He’s now retired, divorced and his daughter hates him. He’s also an alcoholic haunted by a crime he wasn’t able to solve before he retired. Someone stole a Mercedes and used it to drive into a crowd of people waiting for the doors to open at a job fair, killing sixteen people (including an infant).

Two years after the murders, the killer decides to reach out to Hodges and taunt him. The viewer knows the identity of the killer immediately.

That’s all I am going to spoil.

I will say this…this is one whacked out story. I guess that’s why Maniac wanted to take a stab at it (pun intended). It has mystery, horror, sex, incest and masturbation (to his mother, no less and then-to his crime). This guy’s crazy is completely off the chain.

This edit may be as close to perfect as an edit of a television series into a long movie may get. Anjohan may have Game of Thrones down, but there can be no dispute that Maniac has horror down. I watched this coming off of a binge watch of his Hannibal edits. I had high expectations after watching those and reading a few reviews of Mr. Mercedes season one.

I truly felt like I was watching one of Stephen King’s long horror movies. However, this was more a psychological horror than blood and gore (although it is there…in spades). I felt the disturbing cat and mouse game that was being played out as if I was involved. I also felt both-the protagonist’s pain and desire for closure and the antagonist’s torment and desire to unleash the beast-equally.

It was an immersive experience made perfect by the hyperspeed pace and sledgehammer impact of the editing. I don’t believe that I will even bother watching the series now. How could I, after such an experience? (I’m scratching my head thinking that I may go back and watch it again after everyone goes to bed to see if I missed anything). By the way, don’t be shocked to find an easter egg hidden in the movie on the sly.

All things considered, if you are into psychologically disturbing cat and mouse games with a taste of blood and gore, this nearly perfect edit is a must see.

Well done! Two thumbs very enthusiastically held high.
 

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Summer of Soul (...or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised) (2021)
The "never seen" before marketing and subtitle of this wonderful concert documentary "When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised" (referencing the late-great Gil Scott-Heron song) is literally a lie because the concert was actually televised (many hours of it, more than in this new edit of the footage) and it being sold as equivalent to "The black Woodstock" is also a bit of a stretch because it had about a 10th of the audience as that other 1969 mega concert. Those needless exaggerations aside, it's true that this deliriously joyful footage has been criminally neglected for years and was a cultural event that should have been more well known. Director Questlove opts to mix the footage of the 1969 'Harlem Cultural Festival' free park concert with interviews with the performers, audience members and historians, to discuss what it meant and explore the historical and political context in which it took place. This approach keeps the film moving at an electric pace and the commentary is fascinating but it also means we only get to see perhaps an hour of uninterrupted footage (out of about 40 hours). I wanted to see every second of Sly and the Family Stone's set and something as magical as David Ruffin's performance of 'My Girl' should have been shown in full. I'd buy the hell out of a big boxset with all the footage as a bonus and a soundtrack vinyl! The blazing colours of the restoration and upscaling of the 50-year old videotapes is incredible, I thought it must have been 35mm at first. God bless them for maintaining the 4:3 image and even revealing the edges of the tape to show us every last available pixel of the musicians. Watch 'Summer of Soul', it'll make your life better :) .

 

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The Riots 2011: One Week in August (2021)
A feature-length BBC documentary on the 10-year anniversary of the "London Riots". On my way home from work I passed some shops that were being smashed and looted at the time, it was scary stuff and this film took us right back. It was a little frustrating that the film-makers seemed to focus a lot on a few provocative interviews with idiots who had no remorse, saying things like "Afterwards the police came round and arrested people just for stealing stuff. Can you believe that?!?", or talking about how they went to the shops the next day for food and had completely forgotten they'd trashed the place a few hours before. There must have been people who regretted what they did, or turned their lives around and had something positive to say. The most powerful testimony and period footage was of Tariq Jahan, an unbelievably brave and dignified father whose son was killed by rioters. Activist Stafford Scott offers some sage analysis of the context. It's often a tough and bleak 88-minutes to watch. The film clearly lays out how and why the violence first flared up but it could have gone deeper into the human psyche and the breakdown in societal cohesion to explain how it got so bad, so fast. Are we always living near the tipping point of total anarchy and we just don't know it?




Not Quite Hollywood: The Wild, Untold Story of Ozploitation! (2008)
This is one of the funniest documentaries I've ever seen. Every anecdote and opinion is cut with comedy timing. It helps when the interviewees are as enthusiastic and witty as Quentin Tarantino (who has an encyclopedic knowledge and adoration for "Ozploitation"), Barry Humphries, George Miller, many other exploitation auteurs and several acid tongued film critics. It's even more entertaining and engrossing than Mark Hartley's other two exploitation retrospectives 'Machete Maidens Unleashed!' and 'Electric Boogaloo', if such a thing is possible. I was already familiar with a lot of the films (and their reputations and historical significance) from David Stratton's comprehensive 'Stories of Australian Cinema' series, although I've seen few of them and Stratton was definitely not celebrating the movies. It was amusing that everybody interviewed couldn't wait to offer the opinion that Hong Kong action star Jimmy Wang Yu (who came over to appear in the 'The Man from Hong Kong') was the biggest ar**hole they'd ever worked with. If you aren't offended by endless shots of violent explosions, blood gushing everywhere and copious nudity (including a pendulous full-frontal of John Holmes) then this documentary will really cheer you up! I must put films like 'Razorback', 'Dead-End Drive In', 'Mad Dog Morgan', 'Long Weekend' and 'Stone' on my watchlist.

 
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The Skin I Live In (2011)
Pedro Almodóvar
directs an edge-of-your-seat psychological horror. It goes in some deeply disturbing directions that I was not expecting. It's like 'Eyes Without a Face' meets 'The Secret in Their Eyes', with the precision of Stanley Kubrick, the suspense of Alfred Hitchcock, the queasy body-horror of David Cronenberg and Almodóvar's own taste for colourful visuals and sexual exploration. The creepy string score by Alberto Iglesias adds a lot to the macabre atmosphere. Antonio Banderas is terrifying in the way he's so controlled and ruthless. Unfortunately the ending was a bit abrupt and the final confrontation between the main characters was a bit unimaginative.


 

mnkykungfu

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^I hated that movie so much. The way the multiple rapes are portrayed alone was enough to make me discount the director's point of view (who I've never connected with).

Not Quite Hollywood: The Wild, Untold Story of Ozploitation! (2008)
This is one of the funniest documentaries I've ever seen.

Yes! Now THAT is a movie! I too added a bunch of films to my watchlist after this, including Stone, Road Games, Fair Game, and The Man From Hong Kong. It was funny how even though everyone said Jimmy was a Wang, they admitted that the movie came out pretty good.
 

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Broken Embraces (2009)
Another great mystery thriller from Pedro Almodóvar, in which a blind former film Director recounts in flashback his doomed romance and final disastrously received film. Penélope Cruz is the object of his and other men's obsessions, something that is very believable given that it's Cruz. I'm a sucker for films set in the world of film-making. The framing of shots, the vibrant colours and beautiful interior design is a feast for the eyes, even if the plot was not interesting, which it is. There was a shot halfway through which reminded me of the 1960 British Horror movie 'Peeping Tom' (a favourite of mine), then that film is referenced in the dialogue at the end to confirm it. The conclusion is a lot more heart-warming than in some other Almodóvar scripts but was earned by the complex, flawed characters. I felt there were one or two unresolved plot points at the end, left overs from red herrings which were there to obfuscate the mystery.

 

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Dutch Angle: Chas Gerretsen & Apocalypse Now (2019)
A 32-minute short documentary about the life and career of Dutch photographer Chas Gerretsen but it's 90% about his time documenting the production of 'Apocalypse Now'. It's interesting that he went from being an actual Vietnam war photographer, into a fictional movie about the war. The madness and scale of Francis Ford Coppola's vision wasn't entirely dissimilar. There are hundreds of super hi-res beautiful photos to see, including some of deleted or unfilmed scenes, so this is must for AN and photography fans. By the way, I love the title pun!




Memory: The Origins of Alien (2019)
Another fine movie documentary from Alexandre O. Philippe after ones about works by George Lucas, Alfred Hitchcock and George A. Romero. I wasn’t sure there was anything fresh that I could hear about Ridley Scott’s ‘Alien’. I had the ‘Giger’s Alien’ book when I was a kid and Charles de Lauzirika’s ‘The Beast Within’ doc was definitive but Philippe finds a new angle, exploring the influences and ideas that underpinned the movie rather than the nuts and bolts of it’s creation. The 2013 ‘Jodorowsky’s Dune’ doc covered some of this "deep background" stuff already so repeating those parts are largely avoided, the assumption being you’re a fan and you’ve seen that first. Critics, authors and professors discuss the influences from things like Francis Bacon, EC Comics, H.P. Lovecraft, 70s politics, ancient Egypt, Greek myth and writer Dan O’Bannon’s own medical trauma. The contributors have provocative opinions and I wasn’t always sure the things they saw in the piece were really there but they open up a lot of new intellectual avenues to explore a movie I thought I was completely familiar with.

 

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Gonna have to watch that Alien documentary, thanks for letting me know it exists. Especially since I can't find any of the Alien Appendix files anywhere...
 

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Pandora's Box (1992)
I'm a big fan of BBC documentary maker Adam Curtis but only started watching his films after seeing 2004's astonishing 'The Power of Nightmares'. I've been hoping the Beeb would get round to putting some of his earlier works onto iPlayer and finally they did, with just about all of his filmography, so I'm beginning with his first "true" work, 1992's 'Pandora's Box'. As far as I know, it's the first he narrated in his own voice, using his now trademark style (after a decade of making various more conventional TV docs). 'Pandora's Box' is divided into six distinct parts but the overall theme is hubris and unintended consequences, the application of simple human theories, on to a vast complicated world. There is; a comparison of the surprising similarities between Soviet and American planned cities; the RAND corporation and the cold war "balance of terror"; how Keynesian and Friedman economic theory were used in Britain; the "miracle" and then "nightmare" of DDT and the burgeoning environmental movement; and finally how public perception of atomic power went from world-saving panacea, to world-threatening Armageddon. There are tons of great interviews, amazing old footage, persuasive arguments from Curtis but less of the more esoteric editing choices he's known for now.




The Living Dead (1995)

The title of Adam Curtis' 2nd major work is a reference to 'Night of the Living Dead' and 'The Evil Dead' (he draws clips and audio from both) but is also about how the past has been kept alive, altered, magnified and enhanced to serve the purposes of politicians and power structures. It's in three parts; the first is about how the Nazis created their version of German history, then how the Nazis themselves were remembered by the German generations that followed; the second concerns "brain washing", CIA experiments with changing memory and artificial intelligence; the third part links together the dreams of Britain's past evoked by Churchill and how they were picked up by Thatcher and her close ally Airey Neave, who had escaped Colditz. It was beautiful the way Curtis intercut footage of Thatcher trimming roses, with a terrified Deborah Kerr doing the same in 'The Innocents' (1961), then cleverly used that to imply that Kerr (Thatcher) was literally being haunted by the ghost of Churchill. The use of that trademark sped-up Evil Dead-cam (with audio from the movie) to zoom around the Palace of Westminster was amazing.

 

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A Martin Scorsese double bill...

New York, New York (1977)
The USO dancehall-based opening of Martin Scorsese's 'New York, New York' is so much like the opening of Steven Spielberg's '1941' that I almost thought it was on the same sets (Except one is set on V-J Day, the other is set just after Pearl Harbour). Plus Scorsese goes for a deliberately artificial "Old Hollywood" visual aesthetic, a bit like Francis Ford Coppola's 'One from the Heart', so I guess this is just the type of movie a "New Hollywood" Director made when they were doing cocaine by the handful (allegedly). 'New York, New York' is as close to a failure as Scorsese has got in my opinion. The relationship between Liza Minnelli's Jazz singer and Robert De Niro's hot-head saxophonist begins well, it's quirky, spiky and very amusing. However, his erratic behaviour quickly goes from exasperating, to unpleasant, to downright obnoxious, leaving me totally unable to sympathise with him. Minnelli's passive tolerance of his unforgivable behaviour made me dislike her character too. De Niro is given too much leeway to improvise endlessly, it's like when somebody does an impression of De Niro, with all the ticks and mannerisms turned up to 11. E Street Band star Clarence Clemons, one of the all-time great saxophone players, is cast as a fellow musician but a trumpet player for some reason? Minnelli is dressed and made up just like her mother Judy Garland was back in the 40s, and the plot has similarities to 1954's 'A Star is Born', which or course starred Garland. It's a little weird. I watched the 163-minute "Special Edition", rather than the 155-minute theatrical cut and it felt way too long, so maybe the shorter version was the way to go. By the way, the song 'New York, New York' was written for this movie, then Frank Sinatra scored a hit with it in 1980, although the definitive version is of course sung by the Brain Gremlin in 'Gremlins 2: The New Batch'.





After Hours (1985)
I thought this was a relatively minor entry in Martin Scorsese's illustrious filmography but it has to be one of the very best and surely his funniest comedy. It's best to go in knowing nothing about the plot (like I did) because it's about Paul (Griffin Dunne), a bored office worker tumbling on a whim into the world of the people that populate night-time Soho, New York. Not knowing for a single second where the story is going to turn next is a big part of the fun. Scorsese puts you off guard with his first shot, an exciting super fast, super smooth camera glide over onto to something totally banal. Howard Shore's creepy organ score also keeps things tense, then develops into an oppressive Goblin-esque Giallo synth sound (quite unlike anything else I've heard by the composer). The atmosphere is a constant ride of paranoia, melancholy, mania and jet-black comedy. Dunne's exasperated performance is fantastic, he gave me a real big laugh with his deadpan of the line "I'll probably get blamed for that". 'After Hours' needs to be more widely available, I think you can only get a Spanish blu-ray import.

The trailer gives away far too much...


...but this very short clip gives a hint of the humour:

 

mnkykungfu

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'New York, New York' is as close to a failure as Scorsese has got in my opinion.
Ironically, a lot of critics put After Hours in that bracket, too. Comedy really is subjective.

quickly goes from exasperating, to unpleasant, to downright obnoxious, leaving me totally unable to sympathise with him.... (her) tolerance of his unforgivable behaviour made me dislike her character too.
You've just described my feelings on about 50% of Scorsese's films.

although the definitive version is of course sung by the Brain Gremlin in 'Gremlins 2: The New Batch'.
Oh, you! Any excuse to post something from Gremlins 2!
Seriously, speaking of 'doing handfuls of cocaine'.
Anyone who says the '80s weren't the most magical, awesome decade of filmmaking has no soul.
 

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Justice League Grindhoused a fanedit by Gieferg

I went into this edit hoping that it would redeem this movie for me. I wasn't impressed by the original at all. I felt like it was a promotional tool used to imprint into our minds, each of the DCU characters for whom they had (or would eventually) release multiple movies for individually.

It's a good concept in theory. Similar to the cartoon I watched as a kid. I would get to see all of my favorite good guys beat the smack out of all of my favorite bad guys.

That much was true, but it was assembled into a mess that was not cohesive. It seemed more like a DCU consecution.

I watched every fanedit of the original release that i could get my hands on. At least ten.. Every editor did something that improved the movie for me but they could only do so much with the available material.

I'm sure they were as excited as I was to find out about the Snyder version. When it was released I was very excited. Maybe, that would redeem this mess. It was better but not enough to redeem the movie for me. It was soooooo long.

I knew there would be edits. So I watched for them. I followed the thread for this edit and noticed the feedback given by a couple of editors that I respected. I must admit that I didn't have a clear idea of what "Grindhoused" meant. If it wasn't for the positive feedback from Blue Yoda and Dwight Fry, I might not have asked to see this edit.

That would have been my loss. Gieferg completely redeemed this movie for me. This edit may not be for a purist. It was certainly for me. I loved everything about it. I loved the music choices, I loved that there was so many of my favorite songs incorporated. I got to a point where I was guessing if certain songs like "Children of The Sun" would pop up. It felt like a live action Heavy Metal to me. I feel like the cuts and the direction that the narrative choices took made sense.

Most importantly, Gieferg made this movie entertaining, which it really wasn't originally. At least in my opinion. This is my go to version of this movie. I may never look at the DCU or super hero movies the same way again.

Very very enthusiastically recommended. Good job! I can't wait for your next idea. Congratulations on your much deserved win!
 

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Dune (1984)
I treated myself to the new Arrow Video super-deluxe/limited-edition/steelbook/UHD/poster/2xbooks/extras-stuffed 'Dune'84 boxset! I don't have a UHD player yet but the new 4K remaster looks wonderful on the blu-ray. The colour grade looked in line with previous releases, there's just more detail to look at, a benefit of being a movie nobody cares enough about to do any revisionism. I completely love the movie (in any version) and struggle to see the flaws that others see. It's an intoxicating, mad, kinky, visually sumptuous fever-dream with one of my all-time favourite scores. The big hit of electric guitars when Paul conquers Shai-Hulud is difficult to top. The new bonus feature on the toys/merchandising and making-of the soundtrack are very welcome. Whatever the new Denis Villeneuve 'Dune: Part One' turns out like, it will have been worth it just to precipitate this new boxset of Lynch's movie.

Dune-4K.jpg


Here is a 4K sample of the harvester crew rescue scene:


^ At 01.11 you can see the detail of Patrick Stewart's scar makeup. Back when I was watching this movie on a blurry taped-off TV VHS tape I didn't even know he had a scar. If only I'd had a copy with this much reference detail when I sculpted my own harvester model when I was a kid (with just the VHS to pause).



Space Truckers (1996)
I was a teen in the 90s and there hadn't been any new Star Wars for practically my whole life (be careful what you wish for) so I was prepared to watch anything vaguely "space western" at the cinema in 1996 and so were my friends, so off we trooped to see this Stuart Gordon directed schlock $25M b-movie adventure. IIRC, we felt we had been adequately entertained for our ticket price. Rewatching it again, I was still entertained but by laughing with it, as well as at it. The oddball humour and colourful designs are very 2000AD which I liked. The horrifying genetically engineered "square pigs" and satirical "synth burgers" and hot dogs labelled "do not feed to pets" would feel at home in Mega City One. There is also a 'Guardians of the Galaxy' and 'The Fifth Element' vibe to some of it. The three leads aren't the greatest (including a lacklustre Dennis Hopper) but Charles Dance's scenery-chewing, pervert cyborg space-pirate is worth the watch. Dance trying to pull-start his malfunctioning robot penis is very funny and him deadpanning the line "If I had an anus, I'd probably soil myself" was a scream. Some of the practical model FX are great, some of the 90s CGI is terrible and a lot of the wires are blatantly visible (although that might be down to mistakes in the HD remaster). I always associated this with 1997's 'Alien Resurrection' because it also concerns a cargo crew shipping an illegal payload of killer alien/robots on a ship called "Betty". The two films are on a par quality wise but AR had the benefit of being associated with a once noble franchise, so didn't bomb as badly as the original 'Space Truckers' IP.

 

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Okay...so this is a fanedit...

American Gangster Two Tales by L8wrtr

Gangster movies have always been one of my favorite genres. Scarface is my favorite movie of all time. Barely beating out Apocalypse Now and Blade Runner. Go ahead and laugh, I can almost hear you.

When I found out that the multiple award winning L8wrtr had blessed us with his return ("My man!") and his first project was going to be to finish this edit, my hopes were very high. Very very high. I was not disappointed. I was even fortunate enough to get to preview it. Hell yeah!

I won't spend time on the technical aspects, others more savvy than me already have and will. I think it's a flawless masterpiece. Everything flows like it was meant to be. For me...it was. I base my review on previewing the workprint and then the released version, a few days later.

I liked the original which was loosely based on the true story of Frank Lucas's rise and fall as a Harlem drug kingpin who started out as a small time hood falling into the footsteps of Bumpy (real name, seriously) Johnson. The protagonist (or antagonist? Depends on where you stand?) is Ricky Roberts a policeman on a drug task force hell bent on catching him. It feels like an excellent biopic and not really an action movie.

L8wrtr flips the script on that and takes their interwoven stories and ingeniously separates them into three individual yet smoothly consecutive acts. You are able to get to know each character intimately before their lives converge and reach critical mass in the final act.

It is an amazing well thought out narrative restructuring that causes the movie to unfold with a different vibe altogether.

Now it feels like a movie with an element of mystery and the unknown. A cat and mouse game, as it were. You play "cat" with Ritchie as he discovers and is perplexed by this mysterious new high quality heroin that is taking his streets by storm. You are with him as he encounters Lucas at the boxing match and later puts the pieces together. You play "mouse" with Lucas as he rises from Bumpy's footsteps as a criminal mastermind who figures out how to revolutionize the heroin trade. The assumed trademark name, "Blue
Magic" even seems more appropriate now. The "mouse" evades and outsmarts the "cat", the entire time schmoozing the mob while just as powerful. Finally, you are with both of them as the "cat" circles in on the "mouse" and pounces.

The stroke of genius on L8wrtr's part is that even though the acts are presented consecutively, the stories are still running concurrently until the climax that is the concluding act. It's a much better way to watch the movie-by far.

A stunning achievement from a long time missing master of the fanedit. A masterpiece for certain!

It's great to have you back! Your fans are very fortunate! Thanks for allowing me to play a small part.

You never answered me...is Frank a tragic hero?

Highly recommended!
 
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Mr. White by ItsonRandom

I came to the party late on the Breaking Bad phenomenon. I loved Sons of Anarchy with it's gritty realism and tragic hero. I still love Animal Kingdom. The latter being, in my opinion the best show currently run. Too bad that it would be almost impossible to edit...

The person who eventually turned me on to Breaking Bad had lost all credibility with me in regard to her taste in television series. She force fed me far too many episodes of Downton Abbey. Seriously, it was almost a requirement to spend time with her. Absolutely inhumane.

So...when she recommended Breaking Bad because her cousin said that it was "my kind of show", you can imagine my reaction.

That all changed when my brother recommended it, as well. He hates television and told me about how addicted he was to the gritty realism. I bought season one right then. I binge watched the entire season in one watch. Definitely, love that show. I have since watched the entire run enough times to know it well enough to write the screenplay.

I had been away for quite a while unable to spend time on this forum. When I returned there was a plethora of new edits that grabbed my interest. It wasn't until I saw this edit nominated for an award that I realized that it was a movie version of the first season of Breaking Bad. I had to have it. I've watched it twice. The first time it flowed so seamlessly that I couldn't determine most of what was left on the "cutting room floor." It was over before I knew it. The second time, I was able to appreciate the assembly and narrative structure.

ItsonRandom made excellent choices in regard to what scenes to keep for this edit. Focusing on the dynamic between Walter and Jesse was a good move. It seemed flawless and felt like an action movie with a slight docudrama vibe.

The only thing I might have suggested would have been some more music in key places, but he took more of a purist approach which is admirable. Loved the intro and outro! I somehow missed the now infamous phantom credits. Twice.

This is an awesome edit that will deservedly sit beside my Breaking Bad Collection. Oh, and my brother and that girl? He loved it and was in awe that someone would do such a thing. The girl? Well...it's not Downton Abbey, is it?

Excellent edit deserving the award! Congratulations!

Now...where's the REST?
 

ArtisDead

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Halloween Returns by The Butcher

Holy...! I went into this cold not remembering much about the 2018 Halloween that this based on. This edit is hands down the scariest Halloween I've seen since watching the original 1978 version as a kid. I'm not a huge fan of all of the sequels or remakes. I asked to preview this last year and lost it on an external hard drive. Found it and Wow.

I'm going to have to watch the original again and compare but the editing is seamless and the movie just seems darker and more haunting. Like this could really happen somewhere. I really like that Michael is portrayed as a full-on nut job instead of a super-human monster. The music, especially that spike that grinds every so often, is perfect. Made us jump several times. Chilling.

I hope this fanedit is approved by Halloween. It is certainly as good as any other Halloween movies or edits I've seen.
 
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