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A few reviews

TM2YC

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Contact (1985)
Director Alan Clarke based 'Contact' on the memoir of A.F.N. Clarke, a British paratrooper who served in Northern Ireland in the late 70s. The two men worked together to strip the story back to the absolute bare essentials with startling effect. The camera follows the unnamed "Platoon Commander" ('Hellraiser's Sean Chapman) very closely as he wearily leads his men across the countryside. There is no music, virtually no onscreen titles, minimal dialogue (which is mostly confined to military nomenclature), no explanation of the context and little story, yet it's so powerful. You feel tense in the chest as you wait for something to happen to the platoon, sometimes it doesn't, the rustle of leaves and the snap of a twig, was just that and then without warning there are explosions of violence and terror.

Chapman's performance is amazing, conveying everything with haunted eyes and silence. You don't know exactly what is going on inside his head but you know it's not good. In the scenes where he stands and stares at sleeping children, or an old couple, you aren't sure if he's considering killing them, or remembering when he used to feel human. Other scenes where he's putting himself in danger, do not come across as a heroic desire to protect his men but as a sincere death wish. It's all conveyed with such clarity without a word being spoken. Apparently some people, including men who had actually served in NI, initially mistook it for a documentary, it feels that real. An anti-war masterpiece.

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There don't seem to be any clips of 'Contact' on the internet? There's a trailer for the blu-ray boxset it's from though...

 

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Don't Torture a Duckling (1972)
A pretty decent "Giallo" from Lucio Fulci, featuring Tomas Milian and "scream queen" Barbara Bouchet (all of Bouchet in fact). A series of child murders in a remote Italian mountain village stir up the paranoia and anger of the locals who still believe in religion, witchcraft and curses. Repeated shots of a large brutalist concrete flyover are there to tell you this is isn't a place people visit, it's a place they drive past. Fulci doesn't quite have the skill of Dario Argento when it comes to constructing a mystery. I guessed who the killer was the second he walked into frame and had my suspicions confirmed by the constant efforts to make it look like everybody else was the killer. Riz Ortolani's score is very nice.

 

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The Assistant (2020)
Aussie Director Kitty Green (also Writer/Producer/Editor) uses the sort of minimalist techniques employed by Alan Clarke (which I've recently become more familiar with) to give the viewer the horrible experience of being a PA within a Harvey Weinstein-alike film production office for a single day. There is virtually no music, little traditional story, people do talk but there aren't many actual dialogue scenes, the camera movement is contained, the pace of editing is slow, there isn't much exploration of any characters outside of the "protagonist" and the film deliberately avoids showing anything sensational, or giving you any narrative resolution. It's just the mundane and miserable existence of an office worker for 85-minutes, leaving it up to the viewer to pay attention to the signs of abuse glimpsed in the margins of her actions.

The Weinstein-style boss is never directly seen but his malign influence is everywhere in the details and the bullying culture that purveys his office. We only hear him a couple of times down the phone, sounding like the whispered creepy voice from a slasher movie. You'll either find a minute of her photocopying head shots of young actresses to be patience testing, or horrifying because of what it represents. You'll probably either hate this film, or like me, think it's one of the best things you've seen all year. I was so tense throughout and felt like I was having heart palpitations by the end. The scene with the HR guy is so disturbing, thanks in large part to Julia Garner's soul shattering facial performance and the scene where her two colleagues are "helping" her dictate an email is unsettling and claustrophobic. I remember hearing a BBC radio interview with the guy who took over Miramax (after the Weinsteins had left to set up their own company) and he described finding exactly the kind of haunted, shell-shocked employees depicted in 'The Assistant'.



 

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^I added that to my must-see list when it came out.  I heard it reviewed on a couple podcasts, and what interested me was they seemed to say it was focused on showing the complicity of everyone around an abuser that contributes to what some people would call "rape culture".  I've seen stories of horrible, powerful people before.  I haven't seen many stories showing how "good" people help horrible people do horrible things.
 

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mnkykungfu said:
^I added that to my must-see list when it came out.  I heard it reviewed on a couple podcasts, and what interested me was they seemed to say it was focused on showing the complicity of everyone around an abuser that contributes to what some people would call "rape culture".  I've seen stories of horrible, powerful people before.  I haven't seen many stories showing how "good" people help horrible people do horrible things.

That sums it up, denial too, there's enough evidence that everybody pretty much knows what is going on but not enough evidence that everybody can't just lie to themselves and pretend it's not happening.

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Village of the Damned (1960)
The 1960 adaptation of John Wyndham's Sci-Fi novel 'The Midwich Cuckoos' is a mixed bag. The blonde haired, monotone, hive-mind children are really creepy. The opening act depicting all the people in a pleasant looking English country village suddenly losing consciousness is also unsettling. As is the idea of all the women suddenly finding out they are pregnant by an unknown force. Apparently it was originally going to be filmed in the US but the Christian connotations of the premise were thought to be too controversial, so the location was shifted back to the UK. The problem is that all the focus is on male characters, in a story that should be 90% about the experience of the horrified women. In a couple of scenes the men just usher the women out of the room. There's an attitude of "don't worry your pretty head my dear, just leave the old chaps with rich deep voices and sturdy tweed jackets to sort this mess out". It was also slightly absurd to try to make a film about pregnancy, when the film censors wouldn't let you mention the word "pregnant" for fear of causing a national scandal... I was only relieved that they didn't mention a visit from "the Stork". I make an effort to view old films through the lens of the era in which they were made but this one made it difficult. Still the strong Horror/Sci-Fi elements make it well worth enduring the dodgy bits.


Village of the Damned (1995)
Like the 1960 original, John Carpenter's remake of 'Village of the Damned' is another mixed bag but for different reasons. It's broadly the same story about all the women in a village called Midwich (shifted from England to the USA) becoming pregnant after some sort of weird synchronised feinting spell. This time they unwisely make it explicit that it's aliens, of the "grey" type, when keeping it vague was much more creepy. I feel bad for saying it but Mark Hamill is pretty bad as the town priest, thankfully he's mostly overshadowed by a spectacularly bad performance by Kirstie Alley.  Most of the rest of the cast are tolerable. It's a shame because star Christopher Reeve is really terrific in what would be his last role before his tragic horse riding accident. A subject like abortion could never have been addressed in the 1960 movie but in the more more liberated 90s they could and do bring it up but then do almost nothing with it. There is a different angle explored with one of the children rebelling against his brothers and sisters. More gore is allowed this time, the guy accidentally cooking himself on his own barbecue being an icky "highlight". 'Village of the Damned' passes the time but it's noticeably the point where Carpenter has lost his way.

 

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Il Postino (1994)
The story behind the making of 'Il Postino' ('The Postman') is as interesting as the film and informs it's story and mood. Star Massimo Troisi (whose idea the film was) was seriously ill during filming, postponed heart surgery so it could be completed, recorded his dubbing early just in case, was only able to work an hour a day, did only one or two takes and used a double where possible... then sadly died of a heart attack just one day after the film wrapped. The movie tells a fictional story inspired by real events in which Troisi plays temp-postman Mario who is hired to take letters to the famous socialist poet Pablo Neruda while he is in political exile on a remote Italian island. Mario is poorly educated and dissatisfied with small island life, so he enthusiastically takes the opportunity to strike up an unlikely friendship with the intellectual and worldly Neruda, who talks with him about poetry, politics and romance. There are some lovely moments of visual storytelling, like the way a character parks his car is enough to tell us everything about him before he opens the door. It's a beautiful film with a beautiful score by Luis Bacalov (which won the Oscar that year). It's surprising that it was shot (and co-written) by English Director Michael Radford because it feels so Italian.

 

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Nice try, Massimo, but there's only one Postman, and his name is Shakespeare.
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TM2YC

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mnkykungfu said:
Nice try, Costner, but there's only one Postman, and his name is Pat.

postman-pat.jpg

Agreed.
 

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Zombi 3 (1988)
Lucio Fulci's 'Zombi 3' (aka 'Zombie Fleash Eaters 2'/'Zombie 3') is the belated and unrelated sequel to Fulci's own 1979 film. Due to illness and/or creative differences Fulci left after about 50-60% was complete and the film was handed over to Director Bruno Mattei and writer Claudio Fragasso (Fragasso wrote/directed the infamously terrible 'Troll 2'). This is definitely a case of so bad it's good, very, very good. The English dubbing is gloriously bad, to the point where characters are walking over surfaces which make the wrong sounds, or the rhythm of their footsteps aren't even close. The script that the dubbing actors are reading from is like it's written by an alien trying to replicate human speech patterns and almost getting it right. It's set in that little known "America" which has palm trees, jungles and where all the people are Filipino.

The story is some nonsense about the military trying to regain control of a virus they've let loose called "Death1", which turns your blood green and makes people into Zombies. New characters are continually introduced at a slightly faster rate than they can be killed off, what that approach lacks in plot structure, it makes up for in shear forward momentum. The gore splatter FX are as amazingly inventive, as they are nonsensical. There are machete attack zombies, invisible piranha zombies, full grown adult baby zombies, ninja attack zombies and best of all, a flying decapitated head zombie. The fun is all from laughing at the movie because it actually takes itself pretty seriously (improbable as that is). Stefano Mainetti's Goblin-esque synth score is really fantastic too. I'll definitely be watching this one again!



 

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War Dogs (2016) (US HBO)

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The Hangover x (0.25 x The Social Network+The Big Short) x ( 0.75 Lord of War) = War Dogs

This romp from Hangover/Joker director Todd Phillips is... fine. Jonah Hill is good, Miles Teller is perfectly adequate, and Ana de Armas is perfectly wowza. Amazingly, this is based on a true story in which a few upstart 20-somethings became weapons resellers, albeit embellished and with added action. The protagonists are devotees of movies like Scarface, yet seem to have missed the key third-act lesson of every gangster story everywhere: get out while you're ahead, and before you take so much you become a highly visible, easily toppled target. It's the old paradox: those who are smart enough to win at the crime game are too dumb to cash out early, and those dumb enough to enter the game in the first place have to be smart to get anywhere at all. Unless, of course, one works for a large corporation, and buys political support in the guise of respectability. Then one can feed a military-industrial complex for generations.

Grade: B
 

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mnkykungfu said:
TM2YC said:

This must have some kind of meaning for people in the UK...  ?

Yeah, it's a much loved stop-motion kids show that started in the 80s:


Here he is meeting the Queen:

queen-elizabeth-ii-meets-postman-pat-and-his-black-and-white-cat-jess-picture-id71295116


:D

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Sitting in Limbo (2020)
A timely and powerful BBC TV-movie dramatising the persecution and imprisonment of black Londoner Anthony Bryan by the Home Office and British Government as part of the infamous "Windrush Scandal" and their "Hostile Environment" policy. Anthony had lived and worked in the UK for 50-years after legally settling from Jamaica aged 8. The Conservative government realised thousands of such people (who knew no other home but Britain) were an "easy target" for harassment and deportation, since they'd be unable to provide a UK passport and UK birth certificate to prove who they were. 50-years of photographs, children and grandchildren, friends, tax records, receipts, rent payments, exam records, testimony and basic reality were deemed "insufficient" evidence. 'Sitting in Limbo' chronicles the Kafkaesque nightmare Antony found himself in, including bouts of imprisonment and the loss of his job and home. Patrick Robinson plays Anthony brilliantly and the story is well told by Director Stella Corradi, although I didn't think it was very well lit, meaning it was hard to make out what was going on at times. I didn't realise until afterwards that it's written by Anthony's brother. Even as a white guy, born in England, the film had me mentally checking if I knew where my passport and birth certificate were just in case there was a scary knock at the door... it feels like a horror movie. The onscreen text at the end is hot off the presses, revealing most of the victims still haven't been fully compensated, as of the week of broadcast.



The Unwanted: The Secret Windrush Files (2019)
The broadcast of the BBC drama 'Sitting in Limbo' was accompanied by Historian David Olusoga's devastating documentary 'The Unwanted' from 2019 (featuring some of the real people). Olusoga digs through old boxes of Home Office files to chronicle deliberate, systematic and secret racist policies designed at the top of British government, going back to before the HMS Windrush had even reached Britain's shores. We need more illuminating history like this on British TV, let's have less about the bloody Tudors and the two world wars and more about other areas and other periods. It also made a refreshing change to not be about historians giving us their new provocative spin on familiar events and instead had them presenting documents from hidden corners of UK history that we didn't know and have probably avoided.

 

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Mad Max (1979)
Me and my friends used to recite lines from 'Mad Max' to each other when we played computer racing games in the 80s/90s e.g. "I'm a fuel-injected suicide machine!", "I'm laying down a rubber road right to freedom!" and "I'm outta the game" etc (we we're more obsessed by this one than the more popular sequel for some reason). Around that time I got to see Max's "Pursuit Special" car prop when it was housed in a museum not far from where I lived. The custom police vehicles in their striking yellow, blue and red MFP livery look fantastic and those scene of them speeding along, bumper-to-bumper, with the camera nearly touching the road are always thrilling.  It's amazing that I still have every frame and line of all the chase scenes burned into my brain, yet had a hazy recollection of the scenes in middle between Max and his wife... I guess my family VCR had excellent fast-forwarding facilities. I was and still am a big Judge Dredd fan, so the world of Mad Max was very familiar. George Miller's "maximum force of the future" was influenced by 2000AD's post-apocalyptic leather-biker "lawman of the future" and the nightmare "cursed earth" wasteland that surrounded him (JD debuted 2-years before MM). Dredd artist Brendan McCarthy returned the compliment by co-writing 'Mad Max: Fury Road' with Miller years later.

Mel Gibson has done some fine performances in his long career but this first title role wasn't one of them. He does the cold dead-inside Max very well in the 2nd-half but the scenes where he has to be a family man have little chemistry, or emotion. Thankfully most of the rest of the cast are exceptional and take up the slack, like Steve Bisley as dare-devil motorcycle cop 'Goose', Roger Ward's Neckerchief-wearing Police-Captain 'Fifi' and Geoff Parry's morose 'Bubba Zanetti'. Nobody on earth could've played 'The Toecutter' like Hugh Keays-Byrne, it's such an eccentric, memorable and believably insane performance. I love all the lingo like "meat trucks" for ambulances (Similar to Judge Dredd's "Meat wagons"), "road rash" (which was used for the name of a 90s bike game), "bronze" for the Cops and "very toey" for fast. The soundtrack by Brian May (no not that one) is patchy, I love some of it but I've always disliked the cheesy love theme and the singer in the nightclub is terrible. It's surprising how little violence there actually is, being mostly implied through George Miller and his team's genius filming/editing, making cuts to the film that feel like car impacts and knife blows. The most famous and shocking example was them simply tossing a child's shoe and ball into the road to imply a horrific vehicular murder. Characters also talk about violence they've witnessed in explicit detail and we are shown the buildup and then aftermath of presumably terrifying scenes. Perhaps the filmmakers were trying to avoid a tough rating from the censors by keeping blood letting to a minimum (and little profanity) but they managed to imply it too well, earning an R-rating in the US, an 18-Cert in the UK and even bans in a couple of countries.



 

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TM2YC said:
Mad Max (1979)
 It's amazing that I still have every frame and line of all the chase scenes burned into my brain, yet had a hazy recollection of the scenes in middle between Max and his wife... 

I think that's just the movie, actually.  I saw this as a teen and honestly I didn't love it nearly as much as some friends, who quoted all the lines just like you and yours.  But just a few years later, I couldn't have told you what it was about or what Max' motivation was.  He was a supercop fighting supercrazy criminals as far as I remembered.  Family?  What family?  Those were just the strengths of the film, those images.
Years earlier, I had happened to catch Road Warrior on TV, unaware it was a Mad Max sequel.  It was only marketed as "The Road Warrior" where I was, I think because Mad Max was just this little indie Aussie film that small town USA didn't know about.  RW blew my little mind, and I couldn't figure out why nobody was talking about this like it was the next Star Wars!  Later on, my mind was blown again when I finally watched Mad Max and realized it was a "prequel" to the movie I loved so much.  lol
 

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mnkykungfu said:
TM2YC said:
Mad Max (1979)
just a few years later, I couldn't have told you what it was about or what Max' motivation was.

It's about a guy called Max who goes mad, hence the name "Mad Max" :D ... although he's arguably one of the few sane characters in the film ;) .

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Lenny Cooke (2013)
I know zero about basketball which occasionally made it difficult to fully understand what this Safdie brothers documentary was on about. Constantly being told that Lenny Cooke, who I knew nothing about, was once considered better than -insert name of- super famous player who I also knew nothing about, didn't mean much to me. The rules of the game, the scoring system and especially the format of the leagues of the game were just a bunch of jargon too. The basketball draft system does look like a brutal and cynical setup, I was thinking the word "slavery" long before one of the interviewees brought it up.  It's a powerful story about the people that (for whatever reason) only skirt the margins of greatness, told in a refreshing naturalistic way, with no voice-over, no formal interviews to camera and minimal onscreen text. The last scene cleverly takes footage of a young Cooke and (almost) seamlessly inserts the older Cooke into it (using some impressive FX), so he appears to give his 19 year old self a talk about life. It's worth watching just for that scene alone.

 

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The Fog (1980)
Starting as this does with a spooky campfire tale, I think this would've scared me stiff if I'd seen it back when I was a kid, on late night TV but it didn't do much for jaded adult me. I didn't really get invested in many of the characters, except for Hal Holbrook's priest because of the way he is accepts his fate to atone for the sins of his ancestors. Blake's glowing eyes and black silhouette were really cool. Unsurprisingly, Carpenter's Gothic synth soundtrack is fantastic.

 

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The Girl on a Motorcycle (1968)
I first saw this back in the mists of time, long before I knew who Director Jack Cardiff was (one of the greatest ever cinematographers) and I doubt I realised star Marianne Faithfull was such an iconic fixture of the 1960s. She plays a girl who leaves her husband's bed, zips up her skintight leather cat suit and speeds off on her Harley Davidson across the Swiss, French and German countryside to see her lover (played by Alain Delon) and experiences flashbacks, dreams and visions along the way. It's so Sixties, there's mini-skirts, turtlenecks, eroticism, chats about "free love", fondue, endless smoking, constant casual sexism, a Hammond organ score and plenty of colourful psychedelic visuals. Faithfull's leather suit has been influential on everything from Batman to X-men, Underworld to Austin Powers. One of the most exciting things you can put on film is someone riding a motorbike, one of the least exciting is somebody pretending to ride a motorbike and this movie has plenty of both. The former fully captures the spirit of freedom, joy and danger that was intended, the latter looks exactly like what it is, Faithfull being pulled around on a trailer. Oddly the few back-projection shots capture the feeling of speed much better, even though they looked more artificial.


They went with a different title and marketing angle in the USA ;) :

girl-on-a-motorcycle-naked-under-leather-vintage-movie-poster-original-1-sheet-27x41-5442.jpg


EDIT: Oh, I found Director Alex Cox's 1994 introduction of the film for his late night TV film slot:


^ That might of been the very place where I first saw it?
 

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^ I followed that trailer to the film's final scene, which... hmmmm. Okay. :dodgy:

Moving on.



Ad Astra (2019)

Ad_Astra_-_film_poster.jpg


It's... fine. Reasonably pretty, and all that. Fine for a viewing, but, much like The Martian (a lesser film, IMO), not one I'm likely to revisit, especially when the much more memorable First Man has a very similar tone. And the movie's goofier bits remind me that I should really get around to revisiting Red Planet some day. No straight-laced space drama is ever going to top the one-two punch of First Man and Apollo 13, so why even bother trying? Embrace the absurd, I say!

Grade: B

 
TM2YC said:
I get why you'd cast a "face" in [the Liv Tyler] part, it helps the audience remember and make a little more of a connection with a character that is designed to just be in flashback. It might work better to cut out their reunion, that seemed like too neat a conclusion to me. I'd imagined she was someone from a relationship that he had screwed up long, long ago.

I guess that, when you like like Brad Pitt, your relationships don't really end... they just go on pause for a while. :p
 

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Elephant (1989)
Alan Clarke's experimental 39-minute BBC TV film is named 'Elephant' because the "troubles" in Northern Ireland were like an "elephant in our living room". The title and Clarke's distinctive directorial style were reproduced by Gus Van Sant for his 2003 film 'Elephant'. Clarke's film consists of 18 incidents of men being murdered using guns (based on real cases) with no explanation, no context, no dialogue, no story and no music. No hint of who is a loyalist, or republican, a Protestant, or a Catholic, a British soldier, a civilian, or a Paramilitary operative... and that's the point.

Each murder sequence follows a set stylistic pattern where we silently follow a man (who may be the killer, or the victim) walking somewhere in a long gliding steady-cam shot with a distorted lens, a man is violently killed, then we follow the murderer as they leave the scene and finally cut back to observe a lingering image of the victim's body lying there, in whatever awkward and undignified position they fell in.  We see almost no emotion from the killers or victims and see no reaction from the world around the incident, save for a dog barking in the distance of one sequence.  It's the antithesis of the "Hollywood" death scene but not knowing when, where, who, or how the murder is going to happen, makes it equally dramatic. You start to fear anybody who enters the frame as a potential source of danger. Cumulatively these events convey the intended theme of a shocking cycle of senseless slaughter, with no purpose, effect, or understandable goals, that are being allowed to continue by a society that has become numbed to the daily carnage (I think there were about 100 political killings a year at the time).

It looses some of it's dramatic intent when viewed 20-years after the conflict largely ended (we hope) but thanks to some special features on the blu-ray you can get a flavour of it's controversial impact. Clarke and Producer Danny Boyle calmly take questions from sceptical critics and respond to mostly irate phone questions from shocked and confused viewers. Like them, you're sure to have some kind of strong reaction, even if it's just anger at having 39-minutes of your time wasted. Mine was that it's a stark masterpiece of visceral, minimalist, visual film-making.



[video=dailymotion]
 

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I think you're forgetting Emma Peel's leather catsuit on the Avengers :heart:
 
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