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A few reviews
(06-29-2020, 04:00 PM)TM2YC Wrote: This music video for 'Double Trouble' gives a better impression of the movie than the actual trailer:


Wait...has music in Europe not changed at all since Ace of Base in 1991?
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(06-28-2020, 11:34 AM)TM2YC Wrote: National Theatre Live: A Midsummer Night's Dream (2019)
Probably the best adaptation I've seen of 'A Midsummer Night's Dream', on stage, or screen (ooh that rhymes, how appropriate).

Ugh, I will be very happy to never see that damn play again. A bunch of people being hypnotized into infatuation with each other isn't dramatically interesting, let alone funny or whimsical. Give me Much Ado, Taming of the Shrew (problematic content and all), Twelfth Night or As You Like It over Dream any and every day. Tongue
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(06-29-2020, 05:52 PM)mnkykungfu Wrote:
(06-29-2020, 04:00 PM)TM2YC Wrote: This music video for 'Double Trouble' gives a better impression of the movie than the actual trailer:


Wait...has music in Europe not changed at all since Ace of Base in 1991?

Not in Eurovision land. It's a magical kingdom where Euro-Dance/Pop never grows old! Smile

Good Vibrations (2013)
An exhilarating biopic of Belfast "Godfather of Punk" Terri Hooley, chronicling his efforts to run a record shop in the midst of the violent "troubles" and releasing classic singles like The Undertones' 'Teenage Kicks'Richard Dormer brilliantly plays Hooley with a wide-eyed evangelical zeal for music and an almost irrepressible spirit in the face of adversity. Somebody who achieves the impossible because they are too naively optimistic to realise it's impossible. There are real joyous moments like when the opening riff of Stiff Little Fingers' 'Alternative Ulster' comes in 15-mins from the end, or when everybody hears John Peel play 'Teenage Kicks' on his show for the first (and second) time. It's so much fun but it's also not afraid to tackle the hard realities of Northern Island life at the time. It's chilling the way it drops the infamous 'Miami Showband Massacre' incident in there like "This band went on to international success, this band broke up and this band were all murdered". I loved that they didn't try to make the musicians look cool, stylish and modern, it's all bad haircuts and charity shop clothes, so it feels authentic to the period and place. You can almost believe this was shot in the late 70s, not 2013. There is a bit of awkwardness in the last part when you can feel the strain of directing the story into a conventional narrative structure, when something more anarchistic could've suited this rebellious tale much better. If you love Punk and Indie music, you'll love this movie guaranteed.



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Prince of Darkness (1987)
I've seen most of John Carpenter's better films but I'd never seen this one, despite some flaws I really enjoyed it. The romance subplot is rubbish and distracting, Dennis Dun's comic-relief character falls totally flat and is tonally misjudged and the conceit that all the characters have no idea what is going on around them, despite them being there for the explicit purpose of finding out what is going on gets rather silly. Yet, the premise about a priest inviting a team of scientists and students to investigate a bizarre ancient relic, which possibly contains the gestating form of the anti(matter)Christ is fascinating. It's essentially a cerebral spin on the "Teenagers spending a night in a spooky mansion" trope. Donald Pleasence brilliantly plays the priest, a man utterly shattered by having everything he's ever believed proved and disproved in the same revelation. There's a David Cronenberg/'Videodrome' feel to some of it. The swirling green light inside the glass tube FX were really freaky, surrounded by the world's supply of crucifixes and candles.

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23 Paces to Baker Street (1956)

I found this movie on a list of films that were similar to a Hitchcock style of mystery/thriller.  Without a doubt, this feels pretty darn close!  This would've been one of Hitch's many masterpieces if he had made it, but without Hitch, it's a solid ride with some nice twists and turns.  For what it's worth, this film gets compared to Rear Window in most reviews with the similarities of a disabled protagonist that the police don't believe as well as the final standoff in a darkened apartment.

Somewhat recently blinded playwright Philip Hannon is residing in London when he is hanging out at a pub, wallowing over a drink as he overhears what may be a kidnapping plot.  The scene of him overhearing what's going on behind him while other sounds are also happening and drowning parts of the conversation out is VERY reminiscent of something you'd see in a Hitchcock film.  The police don't buy into what Philip may or may not have heard, so he investigates with the help of his old flame, played by Vera Miles and his butler, played by Cecil Parker, who adds some light comedic elements throughout. 

Instead of posting the trailer, which certainly has some spoilers in it, the entire movie is on YouTube and looks like a really nice print.  



I hope some of you will give it a look and let me know what you think!
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(06-30-2020, 03:52 PM)TM2YC Wrote: Good Vibrations (2013)

You convinced me!  Seems up my alley.  Though I feel like I probably saw the whole movie in that trailer, but I'll check it out anyway.
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The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution (2015)
This PBS Documentary does a terrific job of telling the story of the rise and fall of the Black Panther Party, unearthing tons of photos, audio and newsreel, plus interviews with many party members and access to previously secret FBI memos. It captures a brief shining moment of defiance, pride, positivity, cooperation, community programming and outreach, before it was beaten back down by waves of government opposition in the form of arrests, wiretaps, infiltration, police intimidation, frame-ups, targeted legislation and state-sanctioned assassinations, in a deliberate counter-intelligence campaign orchestrated by the FBI under the direction of J. Edgar Hoover (plus it didn't help that one or two of the top BPP leaders were nuts).  It could hardly be a more timely watch.

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The Curse of the Werewolf (1961)
Another Hammer horror corker from Director Terence Fisher. I liked the way this movie really took it's time with the story, we don't even see the Werewolf until the last 10-minutes (the makeup is worth the wait). Usually Lycanthropy is portrayed in films as some sort of genetic aberration, or a transferable disease but here it's like a satanic curse placed on Oliver Reed's character (in his first starring role) because he is the product of a horrific conception and was then born on Christmas day (an old superstition). Reed's presence more than makes up for the absence of any of the other usual Hammer stars.

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(07-02-2020, 04:37 PM)TM2YC Wrote: The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution (2015)

A film podcast I listen to said this whole thing was up on Youtube (I find a good post of it) and worth a watch.  If you haven't heard of CoIntelPro or learned much about Huey P. Newton, Bobby Seale, Fred Hampton, and Stokely Carmichael (they don't teach this stuff in US school), this will probably blow your mind.  I haven't seen the whole thing yet, but it seems worthwhile even for those who do know a little of the history.  Past is present.
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The Beyond aka 7 Doors of Death  (1981)
Lucio Fulci's attempt at Southern Gothic is marred by an incomprehensible plot, no rules or logic to the threat and bad soundFX (though that last one might be my fault for watching it dubbed). It alternates between scenes of the main characters telling each other how spooky everything is and scenes of random disconnected kills of minor characters. I wasn't invested in any of them, so all I got out of it was being impressed with the technical execution of the practical gore FX. If splatter is all you demand of a horror flick, then your thirst for blood will surely be slaked by seeing a man being eaten alive by tarantulas, a woman having her face ripped off by a dog and a schoolgirl's head exploding.

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