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Doctor Who
60s Who is one of my favorite eras of the show, up there with Capaldi.  Glad you're giving it a look.
"Everything ends and it's always sad.  But everything begins again too and that's always happy.  Be happy." ~ The Doctor
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(12-14-2020, 12:41 AM)Handman Wrote: 60s Who is one of my favorite eras of the show, up there with Capaldi.  Glad you're giving it a look.

Just got through The Edge of Destruction, and so far it has one of my favorite moments, the final scene where the Doctor talks to Barbara alone, he apologizes, thanks her, calls her valuable, and is generally very sweet. I knew there was a turning point for the first Doctor going from "grumpy trickster" to "explorer grampa", and that people say he had a "subtle" arc. But I feel like this was very direct, written right into the text (so forget even having to look for subtext). That scene feels so genuine and for lack of a better term, modern, I am really impressed.

The story is slow like I guess most of classic Who is, but holds up really well today, about as well as the first episode of An Unearthly Child. There's something wrong with the TARDIS and its travellers, and with the doors left open in the middle of space, they're starting to become paranoid that something has gotten inside it, and maybe inside one of them. Recommended if you liked the modern Who episode "Midnight".

Thank you for coming to my beat poetry night. Shaba-doo-BAH!
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There's something about those early years where the show was still finding itself and really deciding what kind of show it wanted to be where there was so much creativity and innovation.  Its a shame most of that era is gone, but hopefully once they finish animating the missing Troughton episodes in a couple of years they'll show some love to the Hartnell era.
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So it's impossible to watch Hartnell without noticing he flubs his lines pretty frequently, due to how the show was shot. But I think I have a solution for this, for fan editors.

You'll need your ripped source video and audio and the program Ebsynth to handle the video portion and you can Google search for a free AI voice remover for the audio portion.

See where I'm going with this? You can't cut his line flubs, that would cause jump cuts due to lack of footage. You can't just delete the lines in audio because his mouth is moving. You know what would be a lot more natural than flubs? Mindful pauses. Export a clip as wav and an image sequence.

For the video: Use Ebsynth, and possibly a photo editor to make keyframes from some of the images in the sequence, to basically keep the Doctor's mouth shut for portions of the footage where he used to be talking.

For the audio: Use whatever free online AI service you can find with good results. Split vocals from the audio and use the voice-removed track to fill the gaps where he was talking with consistent background noise.

Just an idea. A small part of a grand idea. Muahaha.
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Hartnell's flubs were sometimes scripted.  It was a part of his character.  The bumbling old man with a mysterious past.  The Romans especially uses it to comedic effect.
"Everything ends and it's always sad.  But everything begins again too and that's always happy.  Be happy." ~ The Doctor
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(12-23-2020, 02:40 AM)Handman Wrote: Hartnell's flubs were sometimes scripted.  It was a part of his character.  The bumbling old man with a mysterious past.  The Romans especially uses it to comedic effect.

There are times it comes across that way, but there are other times he stops in the middle of a line and just repeats the whole thing from the start with a few crucial words flipped and he's really obviously correcting himself. He's not the only one who does it, he just is the most frequent victim of the circumstances, being the knowledgeable elder archetype on what was supposed to be an educational show, he got the most (and most difficult) dialogue. I can't hold it against him.

...

I just finished The Sensorites, so I'm through all of what Britbox has to offer for season 1. Quick reviews of each story so far in order:

1 An Unearthly Child
First episode is really great, and the next three are just ok but they set the tone the show will follow.

2 The Daleks
Seven episodes, this is essentially a film. Incidentally it was adapted into a film, which I've also watched. The film looks better in every way but its continuity is so changed that it cannot replace the episodes. I don't have much to say about the story except it's interesting how the original Dalek concept depended on the Thal people, they're absent from the modern show entirely. Daleks don't default to exterminating but instead to temporarily paralyzing people so their weapons seem like Star Trek phasers whereas nowadays they're like Star Wars blasters. I have more to say about the film than the show version, but that doesn't mean this story is bad.

3 The Edge of Destruction
A bunch of nothing happening in the Tardis had never been so interesting. It helps that it's only two episodes, not much filler.

4 Marco Polo
Despite having to find a reconstruction, this is pretty delightful. Not having the original footage has the accidental bonus of removing ethical concerns over yellowface makeup. Here's hoping it gets animated.

5 The Keys of Marinus
I loved it. Each episode is like a completely different adventure in a new location, kept things fresh the whole time.

6 The Aztecs
The Doctor falls in love on screen for the first time in the show. He encourages Ian to participate in human sacrifice. Barbara may be a God. Not my first time seeing this one. Reminds me of The Road to El Dorado but with time travelers as the con men.

7 The Sensorites
Started strong, but these Ood relatives are actually super boring. Six episodes feel stretched here.

8 Reign of Terror
Not on Britbox, I googled and found it streaming somewhere. French revolution, kinda boring and then the animated episodes are IMO terrible. Jerky motion, quick cuts, floaty eyes, nobody turns their head, the shadows in faces are so sharp you could cut yourself, and the lip movement is mostly really similar to a hand puppet, very unconvincing and slow. I preferred the still photo reconstructions of Marco Polo to this. I know this animation team didn't do any other stories so the other animations may be better. But this did not leave a favorable first impression.

Anyway, that's all of season 1. Feels good to have experienced the whole thing.
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I agree with most of your assessments.  The Sensorites is incredibly dull.  I liked Reign of Terror a bit more than you did.  I haven't sat through the entire reconstruction of Marco Polo, on the DVD there is a 30 minute version, but I liked it well enough.  Season 2 is even better.
"Everything ends and it's always sad.  But everything begins again too and that's always happy.  Be happy." ~ The Doctor
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(12-24-2020, 09:26 AM)Handman Wrote: I agree with most of your assessments.  The Sensorites is incredibly dull.  I liked Reign of Terror a bit more than you did.  I haven't sat through the entire reconstruction of Marco Polo, on the DVD there is a 30 minute version, but I liked it well enough.  Season 2 is even better.

I wrote my review of the whole season, then found Reign of Terror, and really quickly after watching, added my thoughts to make the review 'complete'. I've sat on it since and think that was more of a reaction than a review. Really I don't mind the story, pure historical is just not usually what I come to Doctor Who for. It has a lot more going for it than the Sensorites. I think the animation left a worse taste than I initially thought. Now some time has passed I don't remember it as clearly and kind of just remember the whole, if that makes sense.

I've since watched through a chunk of season two, I may have cried in front of my wife seeing Susan leave. I had seen the "yes, I'll be back" speech before as a clip and had even skimmed the story before. Seeing it in full in proper context with the previous stories in my pocket, it hit me. But this show often does, sometimes at weird times.


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I also watched the new, new year special. I liked it a lot! It was long enough to give time to character interactions and it was a lot of fun. And there were surprises even though the media spoiled plenty.

I dunno, I'm trying to share thoughts without spoiling anything, I watched it free on the bbc america website, don't know how long it'll be available, but curious US viewers can watch there for now. Try to watch the previous special first if you haven't and are able, it'll help.
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It is such a shame most of the third and fourth seasons are gone (obviously).  There is an incredible Hartnell moment in season three in a story that is completely lost.
"Everything ends and it's always sad.  But everything begins again too and that's always happy.  Be happy." ~ The Doctor
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