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Doctor Who
#11
I discovered Doctor Who when I was pretty young. I remember watching Tom Baker outwitting the Daleks through my fingers over my eyes.
In my teens I was an active member of the" Doctor Who appreciation society" in the NW of England and frequented monthly meetings of a scifi club . I have met lots of the classic series' actors including John Pertwee RIP, Peter Davidson, Tom Baker, Colin Baker and many of the Doctors assistants and adversaries (yes I was a massive nerd). Then for me it all went terribly wrong when Sylvester McCoy landed the role. I just couldnt accept him as the Doctor. It felt like a parody of itself. I've still not watched a single episode of the McCoy era.
Then when the "new series'" began I was blown away. Amazing. Well done to the Beeb for breathing new life into it. I've been hooked again since the Eccleston episodes. It now feels like Doctor Who again.
I am comfortable in the knowledge that I know nothing.
http://www.fanedit.org/forums/showthread...n-LPD-edit
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#12
Omaru1982 Wrote:So...I watched an episode of Eccleston's run, Dalek when it originally aired, it was written by Mark Gatiss who I loved in league of Gentlemen so I thought I'd like him here (and by now you'd know him as Mycroft in the Co-written with Steven Moffat 'Sherlock' series.)

Actually, Rob Shearman wrote "Dalek." Smile Mark Gatiss has been heavily involved in the Whoniverse, though.

Omaru1982 Wrote:Troughton I watched a cybermen story where they had used flash animation and recovered audio to rebuild scenes of one of this stories which was very well done, I think I borrowed a couple of his other stories, he had a different energy and I liked him as the doctor.

Sounds like you watched "The Invasion"--a serial with several parts that have missing video, but the audio remains, so the animation was used to fill the gaps.
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#13
bionicbob Wrote:As I said, I don't really understand most of it, and if someone would be willing to explain it to me I would be much appreciative.

Since I joined the show so late in its run (the Davies run was essentially finished when I joined), I'm not really sure what to tell you. I think that Moffat's scripts are smarter overall, but I like Davies as well. There are some who hate Davies, I suppose, but I've also read others who are begging for Moffat to leave and for Davies to come back!

Of course, there's always going to be that contingent of fans who thinks that the show has never been any good since it stopped being in black-and-white and starring William Hartnell. To those fans, I say: Why are you even bothering to watch, then? It's never going to be that again. And frankly, I don't think it should be. I think that, for the most part, the show is better than ever.

bionicbob Wrote:Though I find your comments about Davies dislike for the Military very interesting. For I too found the Doctor's reaction to UNIT through series 1-4 to be at odds with his past history of working with them.

The Eleventh Doctor has shown some more ambiguity on the subject matter of armies, which I like. At any rate, it's always fascinating to see how different writers and actors interpret the character. Jon Pertwee's Doctor would have never gotten along with Tennant, and yet somehow they're both the Doctor through and through.

bionicbob Wrote:I thought it was very touching to have Doctor 11 attempting to call the Brigadier and learning of his passing. I hope they do some sort of tribute to Sarah Jane in series seven.

That was easily my favorite moment of the season. Profoundly moving writing. And hats off to Matt Smith's performance; he seemed absolutely devastated by the news, even though that actor has never shared any screen time with Nicholas Courtney!

I also would very much like to see some kind of tribute to Sarah Jane as well, but I know others who are strongly against it. They see Sarah Jane as a character that brings them such joy that they don't want her story forever dampened by a sudden death. Personally, I think it would be disrespectful not to acknowledge her passing in some way!

In the Doctor Who Magazine issue that paid tribute to Liz Sladen, Davies said that he and Liz had discussed if/when SJA went off the air, that Sarah Jane should go off into space to travel the stars forever, never coming back to Earth again. I would love for the Doctor to find out that this is what actually happened to her, to give her character proper closure without killing her off.

Unfortunately, due to the timing of this season, a year and a half after Sladen's passing, I'm guessing it won't get mentioned after all. Sad
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#14
Nic Stiz Wrote:If your curious as to where you should look, I have two links that might help. One is a link that's supposedly the best 5 classic who episodes for new who fans.

http://thatguywiththeglasses.com/videoli...c-episodes

The second one is a guide about how to get into Doctor Who, best episodes of both new and classic, and an overview of every incarnation of The Doctor.

http://sfdebris.com/videos/doctorwho/101.asp

Thanks for sharing, Nic!

As for the first one, with his top 5: I haven't seen #5 and #4, although I intend to. I have seen #3 and #2, and I agree they're both excellent. But "Genesis of the Daleks" at #1 - Sorry, I just think that serial is overrated. Very silly and too long (at six parts). The really interesting questions, about whether or not the Doctor should do what he's there to do, are addressed all too briefly. But, hey, that guy is entitled to whatever list he wants. Smile

As for the other one, that was a fun overview. I think that "The Eleventh Hour" also makes an excellent starting place, possibly better than any of the other episodes he mentioned. But I understood the reasoning behind all his choices.
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#15
So how OLD is the Doctor?

http://tardis.wikia.com/wiki/The_Doctor%27s_age

I agree with Moffatt's opinion.

Rule One, the Doctor lies.

And two, the Doctor probably has no idea how old he really is, traveling back and forth through Time, how does one even begin to measure time passing?
"... let's go exploring!" -- CALVIN.
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#16
Right! We measure age by the number of revolutions that Earth goes around the sun. When the Doctor is endlessly traveling through time and space, how would he measure years? By the revolutions of Gallifrey? He was hardly ever there to find out even before Gallifrey, um, went away!

That was a fun article. I didn't realize that he had gotten well into his 1000's before the new series "reset" him to only 900 (for some strange, unknown reason). I guess that's why Moffat bumped the Doctor's age back up this season to the 1100's!

I have a hard time believing that his "farewell tour" really took 200 years, though. In his first incarnation, he looked like a doddering old man when he was in that one body for ninety years. How could he not have aged a day in this body if he was traveling for 200 years, even taking into account the idea that Gallifreyan bodies don't age at the same rate as ours? If he said his Gallifreyan body hadn't aged in 50-60 years, I could buy that. But 200? I think that was just Moffat's way of 1) making the distinction between his two different ages clearer in "Impossible Astronaut," and 2) making his age closer to what was said in the original series (as inconsistent as they were themselves).

Anyway, it's great fun to think about, but not anything to worry over. Smile Thanks for sharing that link!
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#17
lpd Wrote:I discovered Doctor Who when I was pretty young. I remember watching Tom Baker outwitting the Daleks through my fingers over my eyes.

Thanks for sharing, lpd!

The budgets for the sets and the effects in the McCoy era were pretty horrible, but I have to admit to liking his interpretation of the character.

This is one of my favorite videos ever: McCoy gets a chance to deliver some Moffat-era dialogue from the Doctor (specifically, the "Stonehenge" speech) at Dragon*Con. Personally, I think he does a terrific job!

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#18
Thanks Tom.
As in the clip, I find McCoy's Doctor is McCoy! In the U.K. for many years before he got the part McCoy was mostly known to me for being on kids tv, funny enough him and Sophie Aldred were both in a kids programmes I think maybe even together at some point, but everything he does is him. I've never seen him be anything were he wasnt acting as himself which I'm sure is his charm for some but I've always found him annoying and now I've found out he's in the new Hobbit films. AHhhhh!
I am comfortable in the knowledge that I know nothing.
http://www.fanedit.org/forums/showthread...n-LPD-edit
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#19
^though not his fault, I hated McCoy's death in the TVM, getting casually gunned down on the streets of L.A, the doctor's smarter than this even at his previously most stupid.
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#20
When Sylvester McCoy was first introduced as the Doctor, I did not care for him either. He seemed to clownish and bumbling. And I assume the producers realized their mistake, as McCoy's Doctor was very quickly retooled into a more darker, master manipulator type figure. They also tried to inject some mystery back into the Doctor, which I really liked and it is the element of the current series that I find thoroughly devilishly delightful.Big Grin So while I think McCoy's intro as the Doctor was silly, I think his evolution in the role was brilliant and it is too bad the series was cancelled because I was really curious about the direction they would have taken the various story elements they were setting up?
"... let's go exploring!" -- CALVIN.
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