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Gemini's Start to Finish HD Conversion, Editing, & Authoring Guide
#31
I got one doubt.

Ok so after finishing editing the movie. To what kind of format and to what specific specs should I convert in order to preserve the HD of my blu ray ripped edit?
So far all the conversions to MOV that I have done look extremely pixelized Sad

I am using Final Cut Pro 7.
Jurassic Park ///: The Survivalist Cut.
http://www.fanedit.org/forums/showthread...post191377
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#32
It is easy to troubleshoot the custom command line. Just delete everything from it and use the GUI to manually set the settings. The custom command line was just a convenience thing for you.
Projects Completed:
Matrix Revolutions - The Epic Edition
The Two Towers Rebuilt

Projects truly In the Works:
Star Trek (2009): Gem Edition

Projects kinda sorta conceptually In The Works:
Riddick: The Chronicles
Star Wars: Return Of The Jedi
Who Watches The Watchmen
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#33
Stygma Raptor Wrote:I got one doubt.

Ok so after finishing editing the movie. To what kind of format and to what specific specs should I convert in order to preserve the HD of my blu ray ripped edit?
So far all the conversions to MOV that I have done look extremely pixelized Sad

I am using Final Cut Pro 7.

Your workflow unfortunately got botched all the way back at the beginning when you converted the blu-ray video to .MOV. I believe there is an Apple workflow guide somewhere here that may be more instructive than this thread about ripping the blu-ray and preparing it for editing. Unfortunately the format us PC folk use called Lagarith isn't an option for you.
Projects Completed:
Matrix Revolutions - The Epic Edition
The Two Towers Rebuilt

Projects truly In the Works:
Star Trek (2009): Gem Edition

Projects kinda sorta conceptually In The Works:
Riddick: The Chronicles
Star Wars: Return Of The Jedi
Who Watches The Watchmen
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#34
geminigod Wrote:It is easy to troubleshoot the custom command line. Just delete everything from it and use the GUI to manually set the settings. The custom command line was just a convenience thing for you.

Yes, already done. The AVCHD is finished and looking good. Smile
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#35
:bounce:
Projects Completed:
Matrix Revolutions - The Epic Edition
The Two Towers Rebuilt

Projects truly In the Works:
Star Trek (2009): Gem Edition

Projects kinda sorta conceptually In The Works:
Riddick: The Chronicles
Star Wars: Return Of The Jedi
Who Watches The Watchmen
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#36
Great thread! Very helpful, thank you so much for creating it.

I understand that going through this workflow there will be some video/audio quality loss -- is the loss negligible or can it really be seen or heard?

I was told the best way to edit losslessly is to simply rip the blu-ray through makemkv and edit without converting or reencoding the video/audio files, but I'm still working on finding a way to do that.
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#37
Morgolking Wrote:Great thread! Very helpful, thank you so much for creating it.

I understand that going through this workflow there will be some video/audio quality loss -- is the loss negligible or can it really be seen or heard?

I was told the best way to edit losslessly is to simply rip the blu-ray through makemkv and edit without converting or reencoding the video/audio files, but I'm still working on finding a way to do that.

Review the part of the thread that talks about lossless video and audio formats that are mostly just used for editing vs. lossy viewing formats that comprises pretty much anything digital that you have ever seen or heard, including Blu-ray.

So in answer to your question, yes the loss is negligible if done properly. The whole point of the thread is to help people achieve the highest possible quality results.

The only other path that might yield comparable or negligibly superior results (with DVD only I think??) is there are some programs like Womble that can be used for basic cut and paste editing. They don't do any video recoding but just stitch the scenes together. You are very limited in what you can do and you still have the audio to deal with. Some great edits have been made this way, but I would never recommend it to anybody even if you just want to make a DVD only edit because you can still make a way higher quality DVD edit by recoding from a Blu-ray following the process I have outlined.

Bottom line: Anything digital is just bits of data. The real question to ask when changing formats is are all those bits being preserved or are some being thrown out? Some codecs preserve while others throw out. The key starting point for any new editor is to learn about the pros and cons of the major video and audio codecs used.
Projects Completed:
Matrix Revolutions - The Epic Edition
The Two Towers Rebuilt

Projects truly In the Works:
Star Trek (2009): Gem Edition

Projects kinda sorta conceptually In The Works:
Riddick: The Chronicles
Star Wars: Return Of The Jedi
Who Watches The Watchmen
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#38
thank you. I really appreciate the time you took to reply to my post. Very excited to start this new hobby of mine. It's great to have experience mentors like you.
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#39
For blu-ray authoring in DVDarchitect, I would like to recommend changing:

"--vbv-maxrate 40000"

to

"--vbv-maxrate 38000"

When using your settings, or Captain Khajiit's settings in the other thread, DVDarchitect would always want to recompress my video tracks. No combination of open/closed gop, bpyramid, weightp, etc made any difference. BUT lowering this maxrate by a marginal amount made it work with any combination of those other settings.

My very poor guess as to why this may be the case is that if the video alone is using the maxbitrate, then once DVDarchitect adds in the audio, the new video/audio combination may exceed the bluray spec limit. So this lowers the max by an amount that allows the audio to be added in, and still remain below the 40k limit.

Whether this is intended, a bug, a coincidence, or I'm just completely wrong, I cannot say.

But it works. DVDarchitect does not require recompressing the video track with this lower vbv-maxrate.
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#40
I've been poring over threads trying to find answers, forgive me if this has already been answered elsewhere.

I'm preparing to render out my first surround edit. I've come to realize I have a lot of remedial learning to do in understanding the nitty gritty of all of this, and my next one will be more involved, but this one didn't have any big audio work to do, so I haven't had to do any real re-construction or anything. So I'm preparing to render the audio as AC-3 Pro.

Two things:

1. My understanding is that generally the way Dolby works, I don't particularly need to do a separate, special stereo track for stereo play, as there's a certain amount of decent automatic downmixing capability built in to the decoder on most players. Is this accurate?

2. Is there any fiddling I should do to the settings, or are the defaults usually sound?

Thanks!
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