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Sony's ''Clean Version'' [Sanitized Movies]
#1
Yes, the very censored edits of movies that ''entertain'' you on in-flight movies and occasional tv transmissions are being distributed officially.

Quote:Sony Pictures Home Entertainment will announce today its “Clean Version” initiative, which “allows viewers to screen the broadcast or airline versions of select Sony films, free from certain mature content.” Rather than forcing consumers to choose whether to buy the original or “clean” cut of a given movie, Sony will instead make these “edited for content” versions available at no additional charge as one of the “extras” included with the theatrical version of the films that are part of the program, purchased on iTunes, VUDU, and FandangoNOW.

Sony’s “Clean Version” project, now under way, launches with the following 24 films, all of them including the option to screen the version “adapted for a wider audience”:

50 First Dates
Battle Of The Year
Big Daddy
Captain Phillips
Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon
Easy A
Elysium
Ghostbusters
Ghostbusters II
Goosebumps
Grown Ups
Grown Ups 2
Hancock
Inferno
Moneyball
Pixels
Spider-Man
Spider-Man 2
Spider-Man 3
The Amazing Spider-Man
The Amazing Spider-Man 2
Step Brothers
Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby
White House Down

https://www.yahoo.com/movies/sony-clean-...01339.html
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#2
Quote:available at no additional charge as one of the “extras”

That's the part I care about. If this quote was different, I would foresee a repeat of a problem that hasn't been around since "Full-Screen" 4:3 DVDs and TVs went out of style. That problem was that there were often two versions of a movie, one being the original release, and another being an edited version. Not a problem if you know what you're buying, but a big problem when it came to gifts. For example, not THAT long ago (but still years ago), I was gifted a "full screen" pan and scan version of The Dark Knight. It remains in its cellophane shrink-wrap to this day. Thankfully these censored versions are not being sold separately so the same mistake can't be repeated on a wide scale.
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#3
(06-07-2017, 08:08 AM)addiesin Wrote:
Quote:available at no additional charge as one of the “extras”

That's the part I care about. If this quote was different, I would foresee a repeat of a problem that hasn't been around since "Full-Screen" 4:3 DVDs and TVs went out of style. That problem was that there were often two versions of a movie, one being the original release, and another being an edited version. Not a problem if you know what you're buying, but a big problem when it came to gifts. For example, not THAT long ago (but still years ago), I was gifted a "full screen" pan and scan version of The Dark Knight. It remains in its cellophane shrink-wrap to this day. Thankfully these censored versions are not being sold separately so the same mistake can't be repeated on a wide scale.

Undecided  I remember my World is not Enough fullscreen DVD that was a gift.  Hard to watch.

Back on topic.....I think this is a great idea.
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#4
This is brilliant. Nice to watch movies as a family without the *awkward* moments. :-)
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#5
[Image: Untitled.png]
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#6
Bah, no Snakes on a Plane.

Or this...

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#7
(06-07-2017, 11:57 AM)dangermouse Wrote: This is brilliant. Nice to watch movies as a family without the *awkward* moments. :-)
Yes, this would be one of the few good reasons (the other being convenience) to use the studios' streaming service. Sure, they could turn it off whenever they want to, but in the mean time you can watch the movies with kids that all of their friends at school all already talking about. And without fast-forwarding, covering eyes, or explaining situations. 

I guess this may be what the studios were waiting on - the opportunity to monetize the already existing airplane edits. In the past, movie studios have sued companies that try to profit from releasing sanitized edits. CleanFlicks (2000-2006) rented sanitized copies of DVDs while storing the unedited copies in the rental store. VidAngel (2014-2016) streamed sanitized edits while holding an unedited DVD for every stream. Both of these continued past their death-by-lawsuit date, but they essentially had to change their business models to the extent that they lost all of their appeal. ClearPlay seemed to avoid the same fate by making its own line of DVD players that mute and skip a regular DVD according to a data file that can be downloaded from their website. 

Of course, a separate topic is whether sanitizing (or bowlderizing) of a film decreases its artistic merit, violates the author's intent, or prevents it from being challenging and thought-provoking to its viewers.
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#8
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#9
(06-07-2017, 04:01 PM)TVs Frink Wrote:

Frink, you're the coolest motherfather Chinese dentist I know.
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#10
I was just wondering the other day about TV and airline versions of movies. More specifically, wondering if the differences are catalogued anywhere. I know some are listed on IFDB as Preservations. I don't care too much about "clean" versions of movies, but alternate cuts are interesting to me - for example, the TV version of The Birdcage contains several extra scenes not available on home video, and apparently the airline version of Meet Joe Black is a whole hour shorter than the original cut.

Edit: I guess IMDB does an alright job of cataloguing the differences in alternate versions.
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