If this is your first time here please read our FAQ and Rules pages. They have some useful information that will get us all off on the right foot. More details on our policies, especially our Own the Source rule are available here. If you do not understand any of these rules send a private message to one of our staff for further details.

We take our anti-piracy policy seriously
#21
^ yep, I doubt he is actually selling these movies legally. Still, you cannot sell anything where fanedits are part of the package. Frink nailed it though. We have zero tolerance for this bullshit.
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#22
(07-18-2016, 08:42 AM)ThrowgnCpr Wrote: ^ yep, I doubt he is actually selling these movies legally. Still, you cannot sell anything where fanedits are part of the package. Frink nailed it though. We have zero tolerance for this bullshit.

Beyond him selling fanedits and "pre-loaded" ripped dvd files, the seriousness of which I don't want to discount but I don't have anything to add either, there is another big issue that doesn't break site rules but does tick me off specifically. His prices. Even if he was doing legitimate business and was not selling fanedits, seriously his prices are ten times higher than just getting a Chromecast and a paid local-content-streaming app for the same functionality. To me the website and product alone looks like an obvious scam.

I reiterate: if you're interested in this guy's stuff, buy a Chromecast instead. Or a Roku. Or any other official streaming device made by a real company. Then get Plex or a similar app. Ta-da! You've just gained streaming functionality that can handle Netflix, Youtube, Hulu, HBO, and local content, as well as a ton of other streaming services for about $40~. And it's legal. Ta-da indeed.
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#23
addiesin is right. Plex costs next to nothing and it has great features! Someone even made a fanedit.org ifdb plugin so you can load your fanedits into your library and it would pick all of the metadata from our website. Great stuff Smile

(08-02-2016, 06:50 AM)ThrowgnCpr Wrote:
(08-02-2016, 06:49 AM)TVs Frink Wrote:
(08-02-2016, 04:34 AM)Kal-El Wrote:
(08-02-2016, 02:12 AM)ssj Wrote: wow, he's still selling them. not sure how that first sentence jibes with the second.

He did say bundled with the Blu-Ray release.

Irrelevant.  In fact, it's worse, because he's saying he can't give it away but he can sell it, which is completely backwards.

Regardless, no more discussion of Avid or his "business practices" going forward.  He's irrelevant to this site.

Doesn't matter. We've been pretty clear about this. What he is doing breaks copyright laws on multiple levels.  We do not need to have a discussion about it though in the Trades and Requests section. If you need clarity on the subject, PM one of our staff.

I think I get it, my apologies. If I get this right, he's selling an illegal BR rip of a film along with his fanedit of that film? All that on a hard drive bundled with some dodgy Chinese media player of sorts? But any case, this was my last question. I do agree that it's best to let this rest and not ever mention his name here again. The less we are/were affiliated with him, the better, most definitely!
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#24
(08-02-2016, 09:31 AM)Kal-El Wrote: If I get this right, he's selling an illegal BR rip of a film

I assume it's illegal.  I suppose it's possible he has permission/rights to sell a digital retail version but it seems quite unlikely.  Regardless, it's not our concern.
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#25
(08-02-2016, 09:31 AM)Kal-El Wrote: addiesin is right. Plex costs next to nothing and it has great features! Someone even made a fanedit.org ifdb plugin so you can load your fanedits into your library and it would pick all of the metadata from our website. Great stuff Smile

We have a Tutorial on that. Smile
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#26
(08-02-2016, 09:31 AM)Kal-El Wrote: I think I get it, my apologies. If I get this right, he's selling an illegal BR rip of a film along with his fanedit of that film?

Sort of, but not exactly. Here's a quote from his website:

Quote:Get Avid4D with a 1Tb USB Hard Drive bundled with a retail physical DVD or blu-ray. The movie will be pre-loaded into your media library, in addition to an Avid4D Edited Recut version of the movie you select from the Avid4D catalog for no extra charge.

It appears that what he has been doing is bundling an official physical DVD or Blu-ray of a movie with the more expensive versions of his device, and also including a rip of said physical copy, as well as his fanedit of the movie, pre-loaded on the device. Apparently, this was limited to one movie and fanedit per device, and the purchaser would get to choose the movie/fanedit combo from a catalog on his site. He may have been under the impression that this would be permitted, since he was including official physical media of the original movie, thus loosely following the own the source rule.

While this does technically follow the letter of the own the source rule, it seems to me to be against the spirit of it. He might argue that he's not selling the fanedit; that he's just selling the physical copy of the original movie and including the ripped version of the movie and his fanedit as free bonuses. But this, while technically true,  doesn't change the fact that this kind of behavior runs the risk of bringing negative attention to the fanediting community, which is a large part of what the rules were created to prevent.
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#27
There isn't anything really up for debate here. U.S. copyright law is pretty clear, and what he is doing is problematic on multiple levels.

Let's assume that he is actually selling a retail copy of the disc with his hard drive. U.S. copyright law states that the individual in ownership of the physical media can make a backup copy for personal use. However, this backup cannot be transferred to a different party. As soon as the backup is transferred to another individual, the original owner is in violation of copyright law. By transferring the disc to a hard drive and then selling it, he has broken the law. The only way he could do this legally is if he sold the empty hardware along with the physical media, and provided instructions for how to make digital backups of media. He is in violation of copyright law prior to the fanedit even entering the picture. Of course if he has arranged to sell legal digital copies, that is a separate matter, but then there would be no need to sell a Blu-ray disc. Every bit of information on his website indicates that he has made a digital rip of the Blu-ray.

Further, by including a fanedit in a sales bundle, there is no clear distinction on the pricing breakdown. With this sale, a fanedit has become part of a monetary transaction. Again, the only way he would be able to do this legally is if he sold the retail version alone and contacted the buyer after the sale with instructions on how to obtain the fanedit (a separate "transaction"). The fanedit cannot be included in a package for sale, even if he claims that that component is free.

He can claim that what he is doing is in the spirit of our own-the-source policy, but it is a definite violation of U.S. copyright law. Maybe he skates by in Australia, but it's a copyright violation in the U.S. Fanedit.org can have no part in these shenanigans.
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#28
Let's also not forget that he used the FE logo as part of the sales pitch for this movie/fanedit bundle, and did so without our permission (which we never would have granted).
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#29
(08-02-2016, 11:46 AM)ThrowgnCpr Wrote: There isn't anything really up for debate here. U.S. copyright law is pretty clear, and what he is doing is problematic on multiple levels.

Let's assume that he is actually selling a retail copy of the disc with his hard drive. U.S. copyright law states that the individual in ownership of the physical media can make a backup copy for personal use. However, this backup cannot be transferred to a different party. As soon as the backup is transferred to another individual, the original owner is in violation of copyright law. By transferring the disc to a hard drive and then selling it, he has broken the law. The only way he could do this legally is if he sold the empty hardware along with the physical media, and provided instructions for how to make digital backups of media. He is in violation of copyright law prior to the fanedit even entering the picture. Of course if he has arranged to sell legal digital copies, that is a separate matter, but then there would be no need to sell a Blu-ray disc. Every bit of information on his website indicates that he has made a digital rip of the Blu-ray.

Further, by including a fanedit in a sales bundle, there is no clear distinction on the pricing breakdown. With this sale, a fanedit has become part of a monetary transaction. Again, the only way he would be able to do this legally is if he sold the retail version alone and contacted the buyer after the sale with instructions on how to obtain the fanedit (a separate "transaction"). The fanedit cannot be included in a package for sale, even if he claims that that component is free.

I know that, and I'm not debating it. I was just pointing out that it appears that the inclusion of a physical copy was intended to fulfill the own the source rule, and he probably assumed that this would be enough to satisfy Fanedit.org. That doesn't make what he did right or legal. It just means that he thought he was being clever enough to protect himself from negative consequences of what he was doing.
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#30
(08-02-2016, 09:37 AM)Q2 Wrote:
(08-02-2016, 09:31 AM)Kal-El Wrote: addiesin is right. Plex costs next to nothing and it has great features! Someone even made a fanedit.org ifdb plugin so you can load your fanedits into your library and it would pick all of the metadata from our website. Great stuff Smile

We have a Tutorial on that. Smile

Did not know that, even better! Thanks for the heads up Smile
I still plan on setting one up and this will most definitely come in handy!

P.S.: I was merely prying a little/being curious as US law is obviously not my forté (check the country flag). Thank you for the info, Throw.
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