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1001 Movies in Chronological Order
(07-25-2020, 07:17 PM)TM2YC Wrote: 60 years ago...

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Breathless (1959)
Director: Jean-Luc Godard
Country: France
Length: 87 minutes
Type: Crime, Drama

Jean-Luc Godard's influential film 'Breathless' ('A Bout de Souffle" = "out of breath") seems intended to break all the formal rules of filmmaking which had then been established for about 25-30 years and still tell a perfectly coherent, easy to follow story, with defined characters... and thereby demonstrate that the rules need not apply. It's filmed hand-held, there is no continuity between edits, 'match cuts' don't match, he makes jump-cuts in the middle of shots, there is 4th-wall breaking, dialogue is placed over people who aren't actually speaking (but which is what they were thinking/expressing non-verbally) and there are self-conscious cameos, of Godard himself, a girl selling copies of his film magazine and other directors too. Martial Solal's Jazz score is excellent, Jean Seberg is breathtaking (like the title) and Jean-Paul Belmondo has a great anti-heroic charisma. He plays Michel, a killer, petty thief and womaniser who is trying to evade capture and spend time with various girls. It's got a tone and style that'll be recognisable to anybody who has seen much later films like 'Pulp Fiction'.





Another Charlton Heston epic next.

I'm with Kermode on this one...i actually prefer the Mr Gere version although its not perfect and could do with a nip & tuck.. My bias is probably due to the fact that i watched it before A Bout de Souffle back in the 80's unknowing that it was a remake. ..but i just couldn't fathom Jean-Paul Belmondo . He drove me as nuts as Brando in A Streetcar Named desire another overrated classic....horses for courses i suppose. Watching Jean Seberg & Vivian Leigh is always a bonus.
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^Last Impressions, out of curiosity, could you help out a clueless speaker of American?  What does the English expression "horses for courses" actually mean?
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(07-30-2020, 07:06 PM)mnkykungfu Wrote: What does the English expression "horses for courses" actually mean?

It means they're delicious to eat.


Only joking. Some race-horses are better suited for running on some race-courses than others.
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(07-31-2020, 01:53 AM)TM2YC Wrote:
(07-30-2020, 07:06 PM)mnkykungfu Wrote: What does the English expression "horses for courses" actually mean?

It means they're delicious to eat.

LOL i just spat my nice cuppa tea all over my screen ...that tickled me....mnkykungfu "Different people like different things" thats why this world is a wonderful place. 

sometimes
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Thank you gents.  I've always figured it was like an expression I'm used to: "Different strokes for different folks", but seeing the etymology of the expression is interesting, too.

And btw, horse meat is delicious.   Angel
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