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SW - Star Wars
Marvel’s Kevin Feige to make a Star Wars movie. This should make the fanboys’ collective head explode.

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-v...ey-1243481
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Last Jedi very much felt like if Marvel and Star Wars had a baby, and look how well that went
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I read parts of Bob Iger's recently-published memoir, and the revelations regarding how George Lucas felt about the Disney/Lucasfilm deal and the resulting movies are both eye-opening and heartbreaking. I'm surprised that Iger thought it was a good idea to publish the book, since it's horrible PR.

Here are some snippets:
 
Quote:Then the more difficult negotiations began over what George’s creative involvement would be. In Pixar’s case, the entire acquisition was predicated on John and Ed’s continued involvement not just with Pixar but with Disney Animation. John became chief creative officer, but he still reported to me. With Marvel, I’d met with Kevin Feige and the rest of their team and I knew what they had in the works, and we’d begun collaborating closely to determine the future of Marvel films. With Lucas, there was only one person with creative control—George. He wanted to retain that control without becoming an employee. It would have been a dereliction of my responsibilities to spend more than $4 billion and then say, essentially, This is still yours. Go ahead and make whatever movies you want to make on whatever timeline you can make them.
Quote:At some point in the process, George told me that he had completed outlines for three new movies. He agreed to send us three copies of the outlines: one for me; one for Alan Braverman; and one for Alan Horn, who’d just been hired to run our studio. Alan Horn and I read George’s outlines and decided we needed to buy them, though we made clear in the purchase agreement that we would not be contractually obligated to adhere to the plot lines he’d laid out.
Quote:It was an upcoming change in capital gains laws that eventually salvaged the negotiations. If we didn’t close the deal by the end of 2012, George, who owned Lucasfilm outright, would take a roughly $500 million hit on the sale. If he was going to sell to us, there was some financial urgency to come to an agreement quickly. He knew that I was going to stand firm on the question of creative control, but it wasn’t an easy thing for him to accept. And so he reluctantly agreed to be available to consult with us at our request. I promised that we would be open to his ideas (this was not a hard promise to make; of course we would be open to George Lucas’s ideas), but like the outlines, we would be under no obligation.
Quote:On October 30, 2012, George came to my office, and we sat at my desk and signed an agreement for Disney to buy Lucasfilm. He was doing everything he could not to show it, but I could tell in the sound of his voice and the look in his eyes how emotional it was for him. He was signing away Star Wars, after all.
Quote:Early on, Kathy brought J.J. and Michael Arndt up to Northern California to meet with George at his ranch and talk about their ideas for the film. George immediately got upset as they began to describe the plot and it dawned on him that we weren’t using one of the stories he submitted during the negotiations.

The truth was, Kathy, J.J., Alan, and I had discussed the direction in which the saga should go, and we all agreed that it wasn’t what George had outlined. George knew we weren’t contractually bound to anything, but he thought that our buying the story treatments was a tacit promise that we’d follow them, and he was disappointed that his story was being discarded. I’d been so careful since our first conversation not to mislead him in any way, and I didn’t think I had now, but I could have handled it better. I should have prepared him for the meeting with J.J. and Michael and told him about our conversations, that we felt it was better to go in another direction. I could have talked through this with him and possibly avoided angering him by not surprising him. Now, in the first meeting with him about the future of Star Wars, George felt betrayed, and while this whole process would never have been easy for him, we’d gotten off to an unnecessarily rocky start.
Quote:Just prior to the global release, Kathy screened The Force Awakens for George. He didn’t hide his disappointment. “There’s nothing new,” he said. In each of the films in the original trilogy, it was important to him to present new worlds, new stories, new characters, and new technologies. In this one, he said, “There weren’t enough visual or technical leaps forward.” He wasn’t wrong, but he also wasn’t appreciating the pressure we were under to give ardent fans a film that felt quintessentially Star Wars. We’d intentionally created a world that was visually and tonally connected to the earlier films, to not stray too far from what people loved and expected, and George was criticizing us for the very thing we were trying to do. Looking back with the perspective of several years and a few more Star Wars films, I believe J.J. achieved the near-impossible, creating a perfect bridge between what had been and what was to come.
Quote:Even though he had issues with the film, I thought it was important for George to be at the Force Awakens premiere. He didn’t want to come at first, but Kathy, with the help of George’s now-wife, Mellody Hobson, convinced him it was the right thing to do. Among the last things we negotiated before the deal closed was a non-disparagement clause. I asked George to agree that he wouldn’t publicly criticize any of the Star Wars films we made. When I brought it up with him, he said, “I’m going to be a big shareholder of the Walt Disney Company. Why would I disparage you or anything you do? You have to trust me.” I took him at his word.
Quote:The movie opened and set a slew of box-office records, and we all breathed a sigh of relief. Our first Star Wars film was behind us and the Star Wars faithful appeared to have loved it. Shortly after the release, though, an interview George had done a few weeks earlier with Charlie Rose aired. George talked about his frustration that we hadn’t followed his outlines and said that selling to Disney was like selling his children to “white slavers.” It was an unfortunate and awkward way for him to describe the feeling of having sold something that he considered his children. I decided to stay quiet and let it pass. There was nothing to be gained from engaging in any public discourse or waging a defense. Mellody sent me an apologetic email, explaining how difficult this had all been for him. Then George called me. “I was out of line,” he said. “I shouldn’t have said it like that. I was trying to explain how hard it is to let this thing go.”

Star Wars Theory did an in-depth video explaining the specifics of how it all went down. It's very informative.



Also, Jeremy Jahns' take on the new information is spot-on (IMO). He used to be a big supporter of Disney's Star Wars, and you can tell in the video just how disillusioned and saddened he is by the revelations. In parts, he even sort of bashes his past self for his former naivete. I've never seen him so emotional before. I must warn you that the video contains a lot of "adult" language, so you shouldn't watch it without headphones if children are around or at work.

Courage, men! we've not sunk before, and we'll not sink now!
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^ None of those quotes sound surprising or controversial to me. That's exactly what I thought. To summarize:

George Lucas "I'm insulted you haven't used any of my terrible ideas and haven't used the film as a testing ground for horrible technologies like 7D projection, octophonic sound and 500fps. All you' done is made a film that everyone enjoyed and that's not what Star Wars films are about. Star Wars is about deliberately antagonizing the fans by not giving them what they want. You've made something that reminds people why they loved my films in the first place and not reminded them of the ones they hated... right I'm off for a sulk... and to count my money"

Big Grin
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Any sympathy I had for Disney Star Wars is gone now. They discredited the original creator's ideas and instead decided to just remake the original trilogy and rip-off the expanded universe.
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Quote:Looking back with the perspective of several years and a few more Star Wars films, I believe J.J. achieved the near-impossible, creating a perfect bridge between what had been and what was to come.

Bullshit. He made an A New Hope ripoff, which was the easiest and most marketable thing to do, and it made the most money of the four new movies in large part because it came first. A bridge to "what was to come"? What bridge? Two of the subsequent three movies, plus Resistance and The Mandalorian, have been prequels to TFA, and TLJ is in many ways an ESB ripoff. And, after TRoS, it'll be years before we get more movies, that might well be set in totally different eras. So, again: what bridge, and to where?!

 
Quote:The truth was, Kathy, J.J., Alan, and I had discussed the direction in which the saga should go

Well, there we go: three producers, and a writer/producer were the brains behind the new Star Wars. Myself, I'd have put together a team of Nicholas Meyer, Ronald D. Moore, Timothy Zahn, Kevin Feige (as much as his Marvel duties allowed), and Dan Knauf. But, hey, that's just moi.

Now, do I believe Lucas' ideas were any good? No, not at all. Do I blame the Disney execs for tossing them? Nope. Should they have handled the transition with Lucas better? Probably, but I don't really care.
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(09-29-2019, 05:46 PM)wilhelm scream Wrote: Any sympathy I had for Disney Star Wars is gone now. They discredited the original creator's ideas and instead decided to just remake the original trilogy and rip-off the expanded universe.

Ok, see you in the theater for the next one.
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(09-29-2019, 06:37 PM)addiesin Wrote:
(09-29-2019, 05:46 PM)wilhelm scream Wrote: Any sympathy I had for Disney Star Wars is gone now. They discredited the original creator's ideas and instead decided to just remake the original trilogy and rip-off the expanded universe.

Ok, see you in the theater for the next one.
Well I'm done with Disney Star Wars after TROS and then I'm retreating into the lovely open arms of Star Wars Legends completely.
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(09-29-2019, 04:01 PM)TM2YC Wrote: ^ None of those quotes sound surprising or controversial to me. That's exactly what I thought. To summarize:

George Lucas "I'm insulted you haven't used any of my terrible ideas and haven't used the film as a testing ground for horrible technologies like 7D projection, octophonic sound and 500fps. All you' done is made a film that everyone enjoyed and that's not what Star Wars films are about. Star Wars is about deliberately antagonizing the fans by not giving them what they want. You've made something that reminds people why they loved my films in the first place and not reminded them of the ones they hated... right I'm off for a sulk... and to count my money"

Big Grin

[Image: giphy.gif]

Everyone is acting like Disney did a terrible thing when in fact they were doing what had to be done as part of business and storytelling. I totally get why George would be emotional about the whole thing but there's nothing to blame Disney for. The Disney Star Wars content is not everyone's cup of tea but it makes sense for them to decide what's best for the franchise especially after buying them. And it's not like they completely ignored George, they were open to his ideas, considered his outlines, kept him as a consultant. It just seems like his "Cosmic Force/Midichlorians/Whills" Sequel Trilogy ideas were terrible, once again completely misunderstanding the mystery and mystique of the Force.

EDIT: Though I expected SW Theory to make that stupid and overlong video, I was so disappointed with Jeremy Jahns when he uploaded his. Come on, you're better than that!
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(09-29-2019, 06:39 PM)wilhelm scream Wrote:
(09-29-2019, 06:37 PM)addiesin Wrote:
(09-29-2019, 05:46 PM)wilhelm scream Wrote: Any sympathy I had for Disney Star Wars is gone now. They discredited the original creator's ideas and instead decided to just remake the original trilogy and rip-off the expanded universe.

Ok, see you in the theater for the next one.
Well I'm done with Disney Star Wars after TROS and then I'm retreating into the lovely open arms of Star Wars Legends completely.

Suuure. You definitely won't watch The Mandalorian or KenobiBig Grin

I'm just teasing, I have no issue with you disliking Disney Star Wars content. It's just that I personally find it extremely silly to hate the company for their content and behavior surrounding that content, or boycotting their future contents. Every company in Hollywood acts like this. The man runs a buzznizz. You can hate the company for monopolizing the entire moviemaking landscape though, I have no issue with that.
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