Fanedit Forums
1001 Movies in Chronological Order - Printable Version

+- Fanedit Forums (https://forums.fanedit.org)
+-- Forum: General Topics (https://forums.fanedit.org/forumdisplay.php?fid=7)
+--- Forum: Movies (https://forums.fanedit.org/forumdisplay.php?fid=34)
+--- Thread: 1001 Movies in Chronological Order (/showthread.php?tid=12356)

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42


RE: 1001 Movies in Chronological Order - Zamros - 05-14-2017

(05-14-2017, 03:16 AM)TM2YC Wrote: Have you been watching 'The Deconstruction of Falling Stars' while partaking of some 'erb...? Big Grin



I did have the crazy thought the other day, that since they are essentially a finite quantity (and most have gone missing), it would be just about feasible to set oneself the goal of watching all silent movies ever made, with a realistic chance of achieving that goal.

In a few century's time, we'll* be looking back on the films of the 20th century with the same reverence as we look back on the works of Shakespeare.

I'm not sure who I'd point to and call the Shakespeare of Film, but my finger would probably rest on the Coen Brothers for the longest.

*The royal we, man...


RE: 1001 Movies in Chronological Order - TM2YC - 05-14-2017

(05-14-2017, 10:24 AM)Zamros Wrote: I'm not sure who I'd point to and call the Shakespeare of Film, but my finger would probably rest on the Coen Brothers for the longest.

Interesting point but I'd probably go Scorsese. To be in his 70s and still making his best films is astounding. Then you factor in his tireless work saving/restoring hundreds of classic films. I can't even imagine cinema today without the impact of Scorsese. Where as I can imagine a world without the Coens (even though I love them, their filmography and their last film a lot).


RE: 1001 Movies in Chronological Order - TM2YC - 05-16-2017

87 years ago...

[Image: 34659743316_835ac2abaa_o.jpg]

An Andalusian Dog (1929)
Director: Luis Buñuel
Country: France
Length: 21 minutes
Type: Silent, Surrealist, Art

'An Andalusian Dog' ('Un Chien Andalou') is the famous surrealist short by Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dalí. I'm sure everybody knows at least some of it by shear cultural osmosis. Radiohead's 1995 video for 'Just' takes a lot of inspiration from Buñuel's style...



...and of course the lyrics to Pixies' kickass song 'Debaser' are about the film (Black Francis even screaming out the film's title)...



There is also an Ash in 'The Evil Dead' feel in there, when the male character is staring in horror as ants crawl out of stigmata in the palm of his hand. There are all kinds of oddities here; dragging the ten-commandments lashed to priests and pianos draped in dead cows, deaths-head moths, fondling of naked buttocks/breasts, sewn-up human mouths (like Neo in The Matrix), body-hair fetishism and a mysterious severed hand. If you watched it enough, I dare say you could draw meaning from it's images (which do stay with you) and it's ideas but I was happy to enjoy it on a surface level of bizarre fun.



Dreyer's Jeanne d'Arc biopic next.


RE: 1001 Movies in Chronological Order - TM2YC - 05-17-2017

87 years ago...

[Image: 34591181371_82f78bf1c5_o.jpg]

The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928)
Director: Carl Theodor Dreyer
Country: France
Length: 96 minutes
Type: Silent, Courtroom-Drama, Religous?

'The Passion of Joan of Arc' (La Passion de Jeanne d'Arc) feels like a film out of time, much more a New Wave 60s piece, than a 1928 silent. The majority takes place in a stark minimalist courtroom, most of the footage is just the faces of people and most of those shots are extreme close ups of Jeanne's tear drenched face. Actress Renée Falconetti must have cried out her entire body weight in tears. The film is prefaced by a crawl telling us that the dialogue is taken straight from the transcripts of Jeanne's trial and we are shown the actual manuscript. It adds a documentary layer to the film that follows.

I was reminded of later films such as Ken Russell's 'The Devils' in the theme and in the minimal set designs. Mostly, it seemed heavily influential on George Lucas' 'THX 1138'. That film's female character LUH-3417, with her shaved head and haunted performance is a close duplicate of the look of Jeanne here. It's no doubt a powerful religious film (for those of that persuasion) but is also powerful on the level of one lone innocent person against the full corrupted power of the state and church. On those two themes, it could be watched in a triple-bill with 2005's 'Sophie Scholl: The Final Days' and Scorsese's 2016 masterpiece 'Silence'.

[Image: 33912800813_982ff31669_c.jpg]

The ending was far more shocking than I expected from a 90 year old movie. We are almost spared nothing of the horror of being burned alive. But perhaps more troubling are the haunted looks on the priests who have enthusiastically condemned Jeanne. We see from their expressions that they realise far too late that they have convicted not a servant of Satan but a Saint and cannot stop it.



In a behind-the-scenes story that echoes the film's subject... the first version of the film was censored by the church/government and then burned in a fire, so Dreyer made a second version using the many outtakes from the first cut... and that too was burned in a fire. Many cuts then circulated trying to approximate the first lost version. Then unexpectedly a perfectly preserved copy of the first cut, fully uncensored, was discovered in a mental hospital. Reading up on the differences, the censored bits sound like some of the film's most memorable moments.

More Buster Keaton next.


RE: 1001 Movies in Chronological Order - Zamros - 05-19-2017

I've been watching Fantomas, Louis Feuillade's 1913 predecessor to The Vampyres. And it is doing the thing I hate silent films doing most: putting too much screen time into reading letters and dialogue cards. It's awkward especially because it was hard to find versions of it, and the one I have is all in French, so I'm having to translate it line by line myself.

I'm starting to agree with you on pre-1920s silent films xD


RE: 1001 Movies in Chronological Order - TM2YC - 05-19-2017

(05-19-2017, 03:30 PM)Zamros Wrote: I'm starting to agree with you on pre-1920s silent films xD

Just going by what is in this book and the other silent movies I've so far watched... pre-1923/1924 is sometimes hard work. After that, all the filmmakers seem to have learned the basic rules of how to tell a story with moving pictures. Then you've got a small window of 5-6 years of pure magic before sound comes in and ruins the party Wink . So far, the only films before 1923 that I'd say were unmissable would be...

D.W. Griffith - Broken Blossoms (1919)
Victor Sjöström - The Phantom Carriage (1921)
Fritz Lang - Dr. Mabuse, the Gambler: Parts 1 and 2 (1922)




87 years ago...

[Image: 33918963994_6e45459373_o.jpg]

Steamboat Bill, Jr. (1928)
Director: Charles Reisner & Buster Keaton
Country: United States
Length: 70 minutes
Type: Silent, Comedy

In my opinion, 'Steamboat Bill, Jr.' is the best Buster Keaton feature (of the ones I've seen so far). The plot/story is really simple and focused (It's 'Romeo and Juliet' on a riverboat) and the location and characters are limited and contained. It all takes place along the same pier, the riverboats, the shopping arcade, the houses. This allows the comedy to be inventive and small (rather than big set-pieces) and the story to be engaging.

[Image: 34629128631_384f39fbd4_o.gif]

[Image: 34760825805_10071f2961_o.gif]

[Image: YmwCy0H.gif]

(Silent comedy is made for animated gifs Big Grin )


The best scenes include Buster's cheeky attempts to spring his dad from jail, Buster trying on various silly hats and of course the hurricane finale. We see a whole town destroyed by a storm, no models, no CGI and Buster caught up in the heart of it. This sequence contains two of his most famous gags, leaning into the wind and the house falling on top of him.



Next up, another Soviet propaganda film *sigh*


RE: 1001 Movies in Chronological Order - Zamros - 05-19-2017

(05-19-2017, 04:02 PM)TM2YC Wrote:
(05-19-2017, 03:30 PM)Zamros Wrote: I'm starting to agree with you on pre-1920s silent films xD

Just going by what is in this book and the other silent movies I've so far watched... pre-1923/1924 is sometimes hard work. After that, all the filmmakers seem to have learned the basic rules of how to tell a story with moving pictures. Then you've got a small window of 5-6 years of pure magic before sound comes in and ruins the party Wink . So far, the only films before 1923 that I'd say were unmissable would be...

D.W. Griffith - Broken Blossoms (1919)
Victor Sjöström - The Phantom Carriage (1921)
Fritz Lang - Dr. Mabuse, the Gambler: Parts 1 and 2 (1922)

There are several Melies pictures I'd say were unmissable; A trip to the moon, Journey into the Impossible.

There's also a 1911 version of Dante's Inferno that is pretty great. It had an impressive budget and special effects for the time. I'm still stuck in 1913...

EDIT: If you like German Expressionism, this is the film that really got the movement kicked off:



Also: Cabiria, the first epic film. Emphasis on the word epic. This inspired D.W. Griffith to make Intolerance.





RE: 1001 Movies in Chronological Order - TM2YC - 05-23-2017

88 years ago...

[Image: 34008424834_455f4ce834_o.jpg]

The Heir to Genghis Khan (1928)
Director: Vsevolod Pudovkin
Country: Russia
Length: 125 minutes
Type: Silent, Drama, Propaganda

'The Heir to Genghis Khan' (aka 'Storm over Asia') is historically speaking, utter b*llocks (as far as I understand). It's about the native Mongol people joining with Soviet forces to expel the evil capitalist British occupation of Mongolia. Except the British never occupied Mongolia and in fact the Soviet Union forcibly established a communist regime in Mongolia, via a campaign of political and religious extermination.

That nonsense aside, is it a good movie? Nope. It's absolute torture for the first hour, with a tolerable second half. The plot is quite thin but still hard to follow, making me feel like I'd missed half the intertiles. A poor Mongolian herdsman is cheated by an evil sneering capitalist b*stard, joins the brave and noble Soviet Partisans, is captured by the British, shot, survives and is then (because he randomly has this talisman thing) installed as the puppet-ruler of Mongolia. Most of the way through, Valéry Inkijinoff's performance in the lead, is blank and emotionless. But suddenly he gets insanely angry and leads an armed insurrection to free Mongolia in the last 15 minutes. There are some interesting uses of editing in there. Drums edited in time with the drum beats and the rapid montage battle scenes at the end but it's not enough to make this a worthwhile watch.



Next up is the first of many films by Alfred Hitchcock in the book.


RE: 1001 Movies in Chronological Order - Rogue-theX - 05-23-2017

Cutout heads aside, that poster is pretty striking ^


RE: 1001 Movies in Chronological Order - TM2YC - 05-23-2017

(05-23-2017, 04:47 PM)Rogue-theX Wrote: Cutout heads aside, that poster is pretty striking ^

Yeah, Soviet posters are beautiful things.