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hebrides Wrote:He was referring most directly to Adric and the Brig
The Brigadier? I dunno...I don't think dying peacefully many years later doesn't really count. Smile
Uncanny Antman Wrote:The Brigadier? I dunno...I don't think dying peacefully many years later doesn't really count. Smile

Fair point, but I don't think it's a stretch at all to think the Brig was on his mind...first time we've seen UNIT since last season's scene where he learns of the Brig's death, which clearly affected him deeply when he was preparing for his own apparently imminent demise. He wanted to have the Brig by his side when he met his end, only to find that he'd missed his chance. That would have to have been one of the Doctor's biggest regrets, especially this Doctor, who has so many of them and who seems to feel worst about how he has treated individual people he's close to.
Very true. Even if not strictly a "lost companion", I agree that The Doctor would have him in mind.

...Certainly more than some of those 'one-trip wonders' that died. Wink
Farewell Ponds.

Mixed reactions over this one. The love story between Rory and Amy was brilliant, wonderful and tear jerking. The Doctor's romance with River never felt more genuine. My heart ached for the Doctor as he pleaded with Amy to come back to the Tardis. So one the emotional side, this episode was a home run for me!

But on the logical side, I am scratching my wibbly-wobbly brain. No one notices the Statue of Liberty stomping through Manhattan? The whole question of what is Fixed Point in Time has me perplexed. Once you know your future you can not stop it??? But the Doctor alters Time on a regular basis does he not? And he knows most of the events he is intervening in? And was not the entire last season about the Doctor altering a Fixed Point in Time -- his own death?

I hope this is the last we see of the Angels for a while, as I feel they are beginning to get over exposed as Who Monsters and losing a wee bit of their scare factor.

But again, a very emotionally satisfying episode. The last scene of little Amy waiting for the Doctor caused me to choke up. I am so going to miss her.

Now we wait til Christmas....
Mixed bag for me as well. I didn't feel any tear-jerking as we watched them exit the show.

There were all kinds of paradoxical problems and I know that was kinda the point at the end, but

Really? One 'survives' to send Rory back? That felt shit. Rory just happened to notice his own grave? Once you know about things you can't change them? Hang on, Amy and Rory did, but then didn't? Amy publishes River's book to leave the afterward? That meant she was always in the past and should have been on the headstone all along. :-o

Another thing that was kinda moot. We all knew they were leaving the show, so tatilising us with, 'they may yet survive' was kinda stupid. This should have been a two-parter. I missed Rose when she went, but here...meh.


I must admit, I'm not as confident with Moffat at the helm as I used to be.
I don't think the angels have really had a good story since Blink, but they are Moffat's 'baby' so he uses them as he sees fit.This and last season have been a mixed bag for me, though I enjoyed about 80% of the fifth series. Moffat overcomplicates things with oh-so-clever time parallel nonsense that makes little sense to me, back to the future was never this complicated and still had timeto make sense without creating giant wtf moments. Even Futurama has the paradox fixing events that stop thigns from happening. Smile

I'll still watch the show but I cringe whenver I see 'written by by Steven Moffat'' his writing is much better suited to Sherlock.
Sorry, I'm going to have to disagree completely again. I loved this episode through and through. Exciting, nail-biting, funny, heartbreaking and heartwarming all at once.

Time travel is inherently contradictory. RTD was just as ready to rewrite the rules as Moffat is. But Moffat always goes for what's best dramatically. And at least in the Moffat era, the Doctor usually has a quick line or two that explains why this time doesn't work according to the same rules as the previous instance. The rules may be stretched, but at least they're acknowledged.

People are seriously losing confidence in Moffat? Need I remind everyone what the RTD era gave us: "Love and Monsters," "Daleks in Manhattan," the ridiculousness of the Master in Season 3 and "The End of Time," etc., etc.?

I also don't think that three appearances ever by the Weeping Angels is somehow too much.

Of course, you're all entitled to think what you want. But sometimes I feel like I'm surrounded by people who hate Christopher Nolan and wish that Joel Schumaker was still making Batman movies. No, sir, I don't get it. Sad
TomH1138 Wrote:Sorry, I'm going to have to disagree completely again. I loved this episode through and through. Exciting, nail-biting, funny, heartbreaking and heartwarming all at once.

Time travel is inherently contradictory. RTD was just as ready to rewrite the rules as Moffat is. But Moffat always goes for what's best dramatically. And at least in the Moffat era, the Doctor usually has a quick line or two that explains why this time doesn't work according to the same rules as the previous instance. The rules may be stretched, but at least they're acknowledged.

People are seriously losing confidence in Moffat? Need I remind everyone what the RTD era gave us: "Love and Monsters," "Daleks in Manhattan," the ridiculousness of the Master in Season 3 and "The End of Time," etc., etc.?

I also don't think that three appearances ever by the Weeping Angels is somehow too much.

Of course, you're all entitled to think what you want. But sometimes I feel like I'm surrounded by people who hate Christopher Nolan and wish that Joel Schumaker was still making Batman movies. No, sir, I don't get it. Sad


I enjoy Moffat's work. And I enjoyed RTD's run too. They both made great, good and bad Who episodes.

And even many "bad" Who episodes are better than a lot of the dreck on television.

And as I said, emotionally this final performance of the Ponds really hit me hard. I loved it in that respect.

It is only afterwards when the episode ended, I had some "logical" questions.

For instances, if Amy Pond edited the mystery novel and wrote an afterward for the Doctor, then yes, clearly this whole adventure was a Fixed Point in history, but then shouldn't Amy's name have been on the Tombstone along with Rory's from the beginning?

And while it is was TOTALLY COOL having the Statue of Liberty as a Weeping Angel, it doesn't make any sense.
In a city that never sleeps, there is no way the Statue could have travelled around New York without being seen.
So yes, a very exciting and cool visual, but even by Doctor Who standards and rules, very unbelievable.

I love Doctor Who. Really I do.
In fact, I think most people who post in this thread still love the show on some level or they would not continue to tune in to watch.
But just because we love it, doesn't mean we can't question it or be disappointed or hoped for some other outcome.

But despite my few and occasional nit picks,
the show is immensely entertaining and I always look forward to the next adventure. Smile
Doctor Who has never made any sense. The fact some people are only now starting to question it's logistics makes me seriously think there just getting too old for the programme.
It was ok. But yes I didnt feel that the loss of Amy and Rory had the crescendo that it deserved. Yeah maybe a two parter was called for as the Doctor brakes the Time rules again and tries to get them back maybe? But hey ho. I know this will probably sound controversial within Doctor Who fandom but I'm wondering if it may be time for a completely fresh start, another reboot type thing as I'm starting to feel maybe, I said maybe, things are staring to feel a little stale but Who knows, (did you see what I did then?) with the new assistant coming in things may feel fresher.